2002 Cover Stories

On this page we are pleased to provide you with explanations for the beautiful pictures that make up the covers for the American Journal of Botany, Volume 89 (2002). We hope you enjoy the stories they tell and open up your possibilities for asking new questions! For members, the links created by the pictures take you back to the specific issue of the AJB.

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Cover Illustration V89.1: Fire rages through oaks, pines, and palmettos at the Archbold Biological Station, Lake Placid, Florida. Scrub oaks quickly regain acorn production following fire. Image credit: Warren Abrahamson. Link to larger JPEG of the image

Link to the American Journal of Botany abstract for the related article, see Abrahamson and Layne: Post-fire recovery of acorn production by four oak species in southern ridge sandhill association in south-central Florida

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Cover Illustration V89.2: Floral diversity in the blueberries (Vaccinieae, Ericaceae). Top row from left: Paphia meiniana, Queensland, Australia (photo: K. A. Kron); Vaccinium corymbosum, eastern United States (photo: K. A. Kron); Macleania stricta, Ecuador (photo: J. L. Luteyn). Second row from left: Satyria warszewiczii, Panama (photo: E. A. Powell), upper—Dimorphanthera anchorifera, New Guinea (photo: K. A. Kron), lower—Vaccinium poasanum, Central America (photo: E. A. Powell), Agapetes serpens, Thailand (photo: K. A. Kron). Bottom row from left: Ceratostema lanigerum, Ecuador (photo: K. A. Kron), Vaccinium myrtoides, China (photo: K. A. Kron). Link to larger JPEG of the image

Link to the American Journal of Botany abstract for the related article, see Kron et al.: Phylogenetic relationships within the blueberry tribe (Vaccinieae, Ericaceae) based on sequence data from matK and nuclear ribosomal ITS regions, with comments on the placement of Satyria

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Cover Illustration V89.3: A leaflet of Rhus toxicodendroides, a fossil plant from the Los Ahuehuetes locality, Puebla, Mexico, a center of diversity for the Anacardiaceae since the Oligocene, suggesting that the area was important for the radiation and diversification for some lineages within the family. Image credit: Hector Hernández Campos. Link to larger JPEG of the image

Link to the American Journal of Botany abstract for the related article, see Ramírez and Cevallos-Ferriz: A diverse assemblage of Anacardiaceae from Oligocene sediments, Tepexi de Rodriguez, Puebla, Mexico

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Cover Illustration V89.4: Inocybe hirsuta var. maxima A. H. Smith (SAT 01-279-08) photographed in the Hoh River Valley in Olympic National Park, Washington, USA. This variety is common in Washington under western hemlock and is also known from eastern North America under eastern hemlock. Image credit: Steve Trudell. Link to larger JPEG of the image

Link to the American Journal of Botany abstract for the related article, see Matheny et al.: Using RPB1 sequences to improve phylogenetic inference among mushrooms (Inocybe, Agaricales)

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Cover Illustration V89.5: A silique of Arabidopsis thaliana enclosing ovules containing torpedo-shaped embryos cultured horizontally in a hormone-free, sucrose-containing medium, photographed 25 d after culture in the dark and 1 d in continuous light. Seedlings arise by viviparous germination of embryos, which complete their development but do not lapse into dormancy. Normal plants are raised by subsequent transplantation of seedlings to soil vermiculite. Image credit: V. Raghavan. Link to larger JPEG of the image

Link to the American Journal of Botany abstract for the related article, see Matheny et al.: Induction of vivipary in Arabidopsis by silique culture: implications for seed dormancy and germination

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Cover Illustration V89.6: Cecropia obtusa Trécul (Cecropiaceae), a pioneer species associated with the initial phases of vegetation sequences of tropical South American forests. Image credit: Yves Caraglio. Link to larger JPEG of the image

Link to the American Journal of Botany abstract for the related article, see Heuret et al.: Synchronization of growth, branching, and flowering processes in the South American tropical tree Cecropia obtusa (Cecropiaceae)

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Cover Illustration V89.7: The giant rosette Espeletia hartwegiana growing in paramo of the central cordillera of Colombia. Image credit: Jason T. Rauscher. Link to larger JPEG of the image

Link to the American Journal of Botany abstract for the related article, see Rauscher: Molecular phylogenetics of the Espeletia complex (Asteraceae): evidence from nrDNA ITS sequences on the closest relatives of an Andean adaptive radiation

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Cover Illustration V89.8: The bull banksia (Banksia grandis) of southwestern Australia. New molecular data suggest that a clade of erect and prostrate shrub banksias with tough, serrate leaves is more closely related to the co-occurring genus Dryandra than to this and other species of tree banksias. Image credit: Bálint Berg. Link to larger JPEG of the image

Link to the American Journal of Botany abstract for the related article, see Mast and Givnish: Historical biogeography and the origin of stomatal distributions in Banksia and Dryandra (Proteaceae) based on their cpDNA phylogeny

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Cover Illustration V89.9: A syrphid fly (Toxomerus spp.) visits a wild radish (Raphanus raphanistrum) flower. Syrphids are one of a variety of effective pollinators of wild radish, which also include bumble bees, honey bees, sweat bees, and cabbage butterflies. The strength of selection exerted by these pollinators and the heritability of floral traits in the field are lessened by a large degree of within-plant variation in these traits. Image credit: Jeffrey Conner. Link to larger JPEG of the image

Link to the American Journal of Botany abstract for the related article, see Williams and Conner: Sources of phenotypic variation in floral traits in wild radish, Raphanus raphanistrum (Brassicaceae)

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Cover Illustration V89.10: Seed samples from the ex situ Phaseoleae collection held at the National Botanic Garden of Belgium and chiefly centered on the conservation of wild forms of Phaseolusand Vigna. Image credit: National Botanic Garden of Belgium. Link to larger JPEG of the image

Link to the American Journal of Botany abstract for the related article, see Degreef et al.: Soil seed bank and seed dormancy in wild populations of lima bean (Fabaceae): considerations for in situ and ex situ conservation

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Cover Illustration V89.11: Hitchenia glauca. This rare member of the ginger family (Zingiberaceae) is restricted to monsoonal forest margins and grasslands in central Myanmar. The conspicuous floral parts are highly modified sterile stamens, or staminodia. Results of phylogenetic analyses based on molecular data have provided new information on relationships among the 50+ genera of the family and form the basis for a new classification as well as setting the stage for investigations of the biogeographic history and floral character evolution in this tropical group of monocots. Image credit: W. J. Kress. Link to larger JPEG of the image

Link to the American Journal of Botany abstract for the related article, see Kress, Prince, and Williams: The phylogeny and a new classification of the gingers (Zingiberaceae): evidence from molecular data

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Cover Illustration V89.12: Mabelia connatifila, one of the triurid taxa represented by exquisitely preserved flowers found in the Cretaceous Raritan Formation of New Jersey. Mabelia is portrayed in a reconstructed habitat of leaf litter that includes remains of the fern Boodlepteris, hamamelids, and conifers (Brachyphyllum). Reconstruction by Michael Rothman. Link to larger JPEG of the image

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