2001 Cover Stories

On this page we are pleased to provide you with explanations for the beautiful pictures that make up the covers for the American Journal of Botany, Volume 88 (2001). We hope you enjoy the stories they tell and open up your possibilities for asking new questions! For members, the links created by the pictures take you back to the specific issue of the AJB.

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Cover Illustration V88.1: Artificially colored ascospores of the saprobic microfungus Aliquandostipite khaoyaiensis (Loculoascomycetes, Ascomycota). The ascospores are hyaline, ~60 µm long, and surrounded by an appressed sheath that detaches when it comes in contact with water. The fungus is thus far known only from the type locality in a tropical rain forest in Thailand. Fruitbodies are ~0.25 mm across, light to dark yellow in color, and formed on decaying wood on the ground. Partly because of their small size, saprobic microfungi are poorly known. Surveys, especially in the tropics, regularly yield high proportions of new species, of which many are difficult to place in the existing taxonomic system, even at the ordinal level. Image credit: Patrik Inderbitzen and Mohamed A. Abdel-Wahab. Link to larger JPEG of the image

Link to the American Journal of Botany abstract for the related article, see Inderbitzen et al.: Aliquandostipitaceae, a new family for two new tropical ascomycetes with unusually wide hyphae and dimorphic ascomata

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Cover Illustration V88.2: The sunflower species Helianthus anomalus from the Little Sahara Sand Dunes in Utah. Image credit: Jason Rick. Link to larger JPEG of the image

Link to the American Journal of Botany abstract for the related article, see Schwarzbach et al.: Transgressive character expression in a hybrid sunflower species

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Cover Illustration V88.3: A flower of Tibouchina semidecandra, a well-known ornamental from southeastern Brazil. Tibouchinais a member of the large tropical family Melastomataceae and together with other Melastomeae has been regarded as representing a relatively basal element of the family. Molecular evidence suggests that Tibouchina, Melastoma, Osbeckia, and other Melastomeae represent a derived clade of Melastomataceae that only recently reached Africa and tropical Asia. Image credit: Susanne Renner. Link to larger JPEG of the image

Link to the American Journal of Botany abstract for the related article, see Clausing and Renner: Molecular phylogenetics of Melastomataceae and Memecylaceae: implications for character evolution

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Cover Illustration V88.4: The magnificent blossoms of magnolias have been highly prized in landscaping for centuries. Molecular analysis of the magnolia family provides new evidence for phylogenetic relationships previously undetected by systematists. Image credits from top left: Michelia champaca; Mich. figo; Mich. maudiae; Magnolia biondii; Mag. zenii; Mag. kobus; Mag. stellata; Mag. campbellii; Mag. sprengeri; Mag. denudata; Mag. cylindrica; Mag. salicifolia; Mag. lilliflora; Mag. acuminata; Manglietia moto; Mang. insignis; Mag. grandiflora; Mag. sharpii; Mag. virginiana; Mag. henryi; Mag. delavayi; Mag. coco; Mag. sieboldii; Mag. wilsonii; Mag. obovata; Mag. officinalis; Mag. tripetala; Mag. splendens; Mag. fraseri; Kmeria septentrionalis; Mag. macrophylla; Liriodendron tulipifera. Photo credit: Sangtae Kim, Richard Figlar, Dorothy Callaway, Munyong Chong, Kihun Song, Holly Forbes, Kenneth Durio, and Junghee Lee. Design: Sangtae Kim. Link to larger JPEG of the image

Link to the American Journal of Botany abstract for the related article, see Kim et al.: Phylogenetic relationships in family Magnoliaceae inferred from ndhFsequences

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Cover Illustration V88.5: Fossil Woodwardia virginica foliage from the middle Miocene Yakima Canyon flora of central Washington State, USA. Vegetative and fertile features of this fossil are remarkably similar to those of the modern "Virginia chain fern" of the Atlantic coastal region, USA. Image credit: Kathleen B. Pigg. Link to larger JPEG of the image

Link to the American Journal of Botany abstract for the related article, see Pigg and Rothwell: Anatomically preserved Woodwardia virginica (Blechnaceae) and a new filicalean fern from the middle Miocene Yakima Canyon flora of central Washington, USA

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Cover Illustration V88.6: A watercolor reproduction of Plate 27, Trichomanes crispum, originally drawn by Walter Fitch for Hooker, W. J. 1862. Garden ferns. Lovell, Reeve & Co., London, UK. Illustration credit: Zorica Dabich, The Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, Illinois. Link to larger JPEG of the image

Link to the American Journal of Botany abstract for the related article, see Pryer et al.: rbcL data reveal two monophyletic groups of filmy ferns (Filicopsida: Hymenophyllaceae)

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Cover Illustration V88.7: Scanning electron micrograph of dichotomously branched, subterranean gametophyte of Psilotum nudum grown in axenic culture. Antheridia are falsely colored blue, archegonia are salmon colored, and hairs and rhizoids are brown. Image credit: Karen Sue Renzaglia. False coloration: Steven Mueller (I.M.A.G.E., SIUC). Link to larger JPEG of the image

Link to the American Journal of Botany abstract for the related article, see Renzaglia et al.: Architecture of the sperm cell of Psilotum

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Cover Illustration V88.8: A hover-fly transports pollinia among flowers of Epipactis helleborine (L.) Crantz in England. Dominantly wasp-mediated cross-pollination has generated genetic structures consistent with random mating in both European and introduced North American populations. Image credit: Richard M. Bateman . Link to larger JPEG of the image

Link to the American Journal of Botany abstract for the related article: Partitioning and diversity of nuclear and organelle markers in native and introduced populations of Epipactis helleborine (Orchidaceae)

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Cover Illustration V88.9: A nocturnal rodent, Gerbilluris paeba, feeds on the copious amounts of jelly-like nectar produced by flowers of the African lily Massonia depressa (Hyacinthaceae). This lily, which has flowers situated at ground level, is the first monocotyledon discovered to be pollinated by rodents. The striking similarities between the flowers of M. depressa and those of unrelated rodent-pollinated Protea spp. (Proteaceae) provide strong support for the concept of convergent floral syndromes. Image credit: Steve Johnson and Anton Pauw. Link to larger JPEG of the image

Link to the American Journal of Botany abstract for the related article, see Johnson et al.: Rodent pollination in the African lily Massonia depressa (Hyacinthaceae)

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Cover Illustration V88.10: Lemon-scented sun orchid, Thelymitra antennifera. Members of Thelymitrinae rely on deceit to attract pollinators. This species blooms at the same time as a similar lilioid flower that offers a reward. The generalized floral morphology seen in Thelymitra probably represents the plesiomorphic state for Diurideae, but members of the subtribe often have highly modified columns adorned with brush-like appendages to assist in pollen presentation, a simple form of which can be seen in this species. Image credit: Dr. Paul Kores. Link to larger JPEG of the image

Link to the American Journal of Botany abstract for the related article, see Kores et al.: A phylogenetic analysis of Diurideae (Orchidaceae) based on plastid DNA sequence data

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Cover Illustration V88.11: Chimeric branches of the sawara false cypress, Chamaecyparis pisifera `nana aureovariegata' collected at Bernheim Forest, Clermont, Kentucky. Albino mutant sectors give rise irreversibly to completely albino branches, suggesting a single cell is the fount of all cells of a shoot. Image credit: Robert W. Korn. Link to larger JPEG of the image

Link to the American Journal of Botany abstract for the related article, see Korn: Analysis of shoot apical organization in six species of the Cupressaceae based on chimeric behavior

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Cover Illustration V88.12: Aristolochia gigantea. Although the flowers of Aristolochia are highly specialized whereas those of Lactoris are less complex, recent phylogenetic analyses based on molecular data suggest an unexpectedly close relationship between the two genera. Stipule ontogeny and morphology are essentially the same in Piperaceae, Saururaceae, and Lactoris, while inflorescence morphology is very similar in Lactoris and Aristolochiaceae. Image credit: F. Gonzalez. Link to larger JPEG of the image

Link to the American Journal of Botany abstract for the related article, see Gonzalez and Rudall: The questionable affinities of Lactoris: evidence from branching pattern, inflorescence morphology, and stipule development

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