2000 Cover Stories

On this page we are pleased to provide you with explanations for the beautiful pictures that make up the covers for the American Journal of Botany, Volume 87 (2000). We hope you enjoy the stories they tell and open up your possibilities for asking new questions! For members, the links created by the pictures take you back to the specific issue of the AJB.

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Cover Illustration V87.1: Color-enhanced scanning electron photomicrograph of a seed of Lobelia inflata (Campanulaceae). The seed's actual width is ~0.30 mm. An individual of this monocarpic and self-fertilizing species typically produces 50–100 fruits, each containing up to 500 seeds. This species has a strict light requirement for germination. Image credit: Ping Li, Dalhousie University. Link to larger JPEG of the image
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Cover Illustration V87.2 A stoma from the scale of a female cone of Rocky Mountain Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. glauca). Magnification = 6800x. Photosynthesis and respiration of male and female cones of Douglas-fir may have significant effects on whole-tree physiology. Image credit: Kevin Hultine. Link to larger JPEG of the image

Link to the American Journal of Botany abstract for the related article, see McDowell et al.: Carbon and nitrogen allocation to male and female reproduction in Rocky Mountain Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. glauca, Pinaceae)

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Cover Illustration V87.3: Flowers of Wisteria floribunda, a well-known ornamental plant from East Asia. Wisteria has been placed in the predominantly tropical tribe Millettieae by its morphological similarities. However, molecular evidence suggests that Wisteria and a tropical genus Callerya are closer to many temperate herbaceous legumes but not to other Millettieae members. Image credit: Jer-Ming Hu. Link to larger JPEG of the image

Link to the American Journal of Botany abstract for the related article, see Hu et al.: Phylogenetic systematics of the tribe Millettieae (Leguminosae) based on chloroplast trnK/matK sequences and its implications for evolutionary patterns in Papilionoideae

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Cover Illustration V87.4: Sixteen photographs of a single shoot of the vine Lonicera japonica are superimposed to create a time-lapse image of its clockwise rotation. The photographs were taken over a 2-h period and represent the plant movement known as circumnutation. Image credit: Ash Kaushesh. Link to larger JPEG of the image

Link to the American Journal of Botany abstract for the related article, see Larson.: Circumnutation behavior of an exotic honeysuckle vine and its native congener: influence on clonal mobility

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Cover Illustration V87.5: A site on Stepping Stones Island along the west coast of the Antarctic Peninsula where plants were collected for field and environmental chamber experiments examining the influence of temperature on the growth of flowering plants. Image credit: Thomas A. Day. Link to larger JPEG of the image

Link to the American Journal of Botany abstract for the related article, see Xiong, Mueller, and Day: Photosynthetic and respiratory acclimation and growth response of Antarctic vascular plants to contrastng temperature regimes

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Cover Illustration V87.6: White-lined moth (Hyles lineata) and bumble bee (Bombus pennsylvanicus sonorus) foraging on Agave palmeri in a wild population near Fort Huachuca, Arizona. Image credit: © Jennifer Johnston, Desert Botanical Garden, Phoenix, Arizona. Link to larger JPEG of the image

Link to the American Journal of Botany abstract for the related article, see Slauson: Pollination biology of two chiropterophilous agaves in Arizona

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Cover Illustration V87.7: Flower of Nasa urensfrom the genus Nasa (Loasaceae), a taxon that contains only iridoids that are widespread in the family. Link to larger JPEG of the image

Link to the American Journal of Botany abstract for the related article, see Weigend, Kufer, and Müller: Phytochemistry and the systematics and ecology of Loasaceae and Gronoviaceae (Loasales)

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Cover Illustration V87.8: Computer-generated three-dimensional reconstruction of the male germ unit of rye (Secale cereale) based upon serial ultrathin sections. The two elongated sperm cells are connected at one end and each contains some plastids (green), as well as numerous mitochondria (red) and a nucleus (blue). The vegetative nucleus (blue) is closely associated with the sperm cells, but not connected; it contains a single nucleolus (white). Image credit: H. Lloyd Mogensen. Link to larger JPEG of the image

Link to the American Journal of Botany abstract for the related article, see Mogensen and Rusche: Occurrence of plastids in rye (Poaceae) sperm cells

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Cover Illustration V87.9: Cauliflorous figs of Ficus itoana from Madang, Papua, New Guinea. This species is functionally dioecious due to the interaction of the pollinating fig wasp Ceratosolen armipes,with two types of figs on separate plants. Functionally dioecious figs in subgenus Ficus have been found to be nonmonophyletic. Image credit: George D. Weiblen and Moyang Okira. Link to larger JPEG of the image

Link to the American Journal of Botany abstract for the related article, see Weiblen: Phylogenetic relationships of functionally dioecious Ficus (Moraceae) based on ribosomal DNA sequences and morphology

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Cover Illustration V87.10: Scanning electron micrograph of an early floral developmental stage of the outcrossing subspecies of Clarkia xantania (Onagraceae). Sepals, which are covered by trichomes, have been partially removed and floral organs have been falsely colored: style and stigma, yellow; large anthers, blue; small anthers, purple; petals, red. Photo credit: C. J. Runions. Link to larger JPEG of the image

Link to the American Journal of Botany abstract for the related article, see Runions and Geber: Evolution of the self-pollinating flower in Clarkia xantania (Onograceae). I. Size and development of floral organs

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Cover Illustration V87.11: A projection of 29 confocal optical sections taken at 0.2-µm intervals through the hyphal network in an inner cortical cell of a root of Medicago truncatula colonized by arbuscular-mycorrhizal fungi. The root section was stained with Texas-Red conjugated to wheat germ agglutinin, which binds to the surface of the hyphae. Confocal images by E. B. Blancaflor, L. Zhao, and M. J. Harrison. Link to larger JPEG of the image

Link to the American Journal of Botany abstract for the related article, see Blancaflor and Gilroy: Plant cell biology in the new millennium: new tools and new insights

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Cover Illustration V87.12: The nonphotosynthetic plant Sarcodes sanguinea (Monotropoideae, Ericaceae) receives all its carbon from the ectomycorrhizal basidiomycete Rhizopogon ellenae (Boletales) that proliferates in its immediate surroundings. Image credit: Dirk Redecker. Link to larger JPEG of the image

Links to the American Journal of Botany abstracts for the related articles, see Kretzer et al. Regional specialization of Sarcodes sanguinea (Ericaceae) on a single fungal symbiont from the Rhizopogon ellenae (Rhizopogonaceae) species complex
and Bidartondo et al: High root concentration and uneven ectomycorrhizal diversity near Sarcodes sanguinea (Ericaceae): a cheater that stimulates its victims?

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