1999 Cover Stories

On this page we are pleased to provide you with explanations for the beautiful pictures that make up the covers for the American Journal of Botany, Volume 86 (1999). We hope you enjoy the stories they tell and open up your possibilities for asking new questions! For members, the links created by the pictures take you back to the specific issue of the AJB.

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Cover Illustration V86.1: The dung beetle Paragymnopleurus pauliani (Scarabaeidae) is visiting the zygomorphic flower of Orchidantha inouei (Lowiaceae), presumably being attracted to the dung-like odor of the flower. Image credit: Shoko Sakai. Link to larger JPEG of the image

Link to the American Journal of Botany abstract for the related article, see Slauson: A new pollination system: dung-beetle pollination discovered in Orchidantha inouei (Lowiaceae, Zingiberales) in Sarawak, Malaysia

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Cover Illustration V86.2: Time series during hydration of an oriental spruce (Picea orientalis) pollen grain. Rhodamine B stains the exine (red) while fluorescein diacetate crosses plasmalemmae and indicates esterase activity in the living cells (green). Swelling of the tube cell reduces the volume of the saccate air space and results in a loss of pollen buoyancy. Confocal extended depth of focus sections taken at (top to bottom) 1, 8, and 15 min after start of hydration. Image credit: C. John Runions. Link to larger JPEG of the image

Link to the American Journal of Botany abstract for the related article, see Runions et al.: Pollination of Picea orientalis (Pinaceae): saccus morphology governs pollen buoyancy

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Cover Illustration V86.3: Longitudinal section of a pistillate floret of Heteropogon contortus, stained with DAPI. Nuclei are brightly stained in both gynoecium and anthers, even though the anthers have largely ceased growth. Image credit: L. G. Le Roux. Link to larger JPEG of the image

Link to the American Journal of Botany abstract for the related article, see Le Roux and Kellogg: Floral development and the formation of unisexual spikelets in the Andropogoneae (Poaceae)

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Cover Illustration V86.4: Leptonycteris curasoae visiting flowers of Stenocereus stellatus in a wild population in Zapotitlán de las Salinas, Tehuacán Valley, Mexico. Image credit: Jose Antonio Soriano, Instituto de Ecologia, UNAM. Link to larger JPEG of the image

Link to the American Journal of Botany abstract for the related article, see Casas et al.: Reproductive biology and the process of domestication of the columnar cactus Stenocereus stellatus in Central Mexico

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Cover Illustration V86.5: In the dark forest understory, white flowers of the ginger Zingiber longipedunculatum are pollinated by pollen-collecting female Amegilla bees (Anthophoridae). Ginger species in a Bornean forest show high diversity, but they were grouped into only three pollination guilds. Image credit: Shoko Sakai. Link to larger JPEG of the image

Link to the American Journal of Botany abstract for the related article, see Sakai, Kato, and Inoue: Three pollination guilds and variation in floral characteristics of Bornean gingers (Zingiberaceae and Costaceae)

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Cover Illustration V86.6: View of "Tres Picos" (Three Peaks) from Villagra on Robinson Crusoe Island, which is in the Juan Fernandez archipelago off the coast of Chile. The closer vegetation represents the habitat for Lactoris fernandeziana (Lactoridaceae). Image credit: Gregory J. Anderson. Link to larger JPEG of the image

Link to the American Journal of Botany abstract for the related article, see Bernardello et al.: Reproductive biology of Lactoris fernandeziana (Lactoridaceae)

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Cover Illustration V86.7: Scanning electron micrograph of a young sunflower capitulum (left) and simulation of the same structure based on mechanical buckling of a thin circular plate (right). One family of spirals is highlighted in yellow. Micrograph by J. Dumais, simulation by S. C. Rennich. Link to larger JPEG of the image

Link to the American Journal of Botany abstract for the related article, see Green: Expression of pattern in plants: combining molecular and calculus-based biophysical paradigms

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Cover Illustration V86.8: Inflorescence with flowers of purple loosestrife, Lythrum salicaria (left panel). Depending on the relative length of styles with respect to stamens within flowers, individuals are categorized into three floral morphs. The three floral morphs also differ in size and shape of stigmas (right panel). Stigmas (top–long morph, middle–mid morph, and bottom–short morph, in the right panel; bar = 200 µm) are digitally false-colored computer-enhanced images from scanning electron micrographs. Image credits: M. Biernacki, T. K. Mal, R. J. Williams, and The Camera Shop, Broomall, Pennsylvania. Link to larger JPEG of the image

Link to the American Journal of Botany abstract for the related article, see Hermann et al.: Quantitative evaluation of stigma polymorphism in a tristylous weed, Lythrum salicaria (Lythraceae)

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Cover Illustration V86.9: The kàkà beak, Clianthus puniceus (Fabaceae), is an endangered shrub that is endemic to New Zealand. Image credit: Steven J. Wagstaff. Link to larger JPEG of the image

Link to the American Journal of Botany abstract for the related article, see Wagstaff et al.: Classification, origins, and patterns of diversification in New Zealand Carmichaelinae (Fabaceae)

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Cover Illustration V86.10: Fruiting capsule of a Pachira species from Estado Amazonas, Venezuela, which has been opened to show its large, floatable seeds. The seeds of other species in this genus of tropical trees are smaller and surrounded by dense, non-wettable hairs. Pachira is a member of the traditional family Bombacaceae, which like the Sterculiaceae and Tiliaceae has been found to be non-monophyletic. Image credit: Gustavo A. Romero. Link to larger JPEG of the image

Link to the American Journal of Botany abstract for the related article, see Alverson et al.: Phylogeny of the core Malvales: evidence from ndhF sequence data

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Cover Illustration V86.11: World in a petri dish constructed from various morphological mutants of the moss Funaria hygrometrica tries to capture the potential of mosses as a global experimental system for plant biology. Image credit: Michael L. Christianson. Link to larger JPEG of the image

Link to the American Journal of Botany abstract for the related article, see Christianson and Hornbuckle: Phenylurea cytokinins assayed for induction of shoot buds in the moss Funaria hygrometrica

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Cover Illustration V86.12: American lotus flower (Nelumbo utea: Nelumbonaceae) on the second day of anthesis, showing a central, gynoecial receptacle and several whorls of dehiscent stamens. Historically, Nelumbo has been considered to be closely related to Nymphaeales (water lilies); however, new systematic work has allied the genus with lower eudicots. Link to larger JPEG of the image

Link to the American Journal of Botany abstract for the related article, see Kreunen and Osborn: Pollen and anther development in Nelumbo (Nelumbonaceae)

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