1998 Cover Stories

On this page we are pleased to provide you with explanations for the beautiful pictures that make up the covers for the American Journal of Botany, Volume 85 (1998). At present we are displaying only the last for covers for the 1998 year as these are the first issues covers that appear on the internet. We hope you enjoy the stories they tell and open up your possibilities for asking new questions! For members, the links created by the pictures take you back to the specific issue of the AJB.

abot851 Cover Illustration V85.1: The yellow, fourmerous, tubular flowers of Kalanchoe marmorata from Central East Africa illustrate two aspects of convergent evolution in Crassulaceae: sympetaly and variation in number of floral parts (either a reduction or increase). Image credit: Frits Kindt and Henk't Hart. Link to larger JPEG of the image

Link to the American Journal of Botany abstract for the related article, see Van Ham and Henk't Hart: Phylogenetic relationships in Crassulaceae inferred from chloroplast DNA restriction-site variation

abot852 Cover Illustration V85.2: A flowering head of Cirsium pupuratum and a nectar-foraging bumble bee, Bombu honshuensis. Link to larger JPEG of the image

Link to the American Journal of Botany abstract for the related article, see K Ohashi and T Yahara: Effects of variation in flower number on pollinator visits in Cirsium purpuratum (Asteraceae)

abot853 Cover Illustration V85.3: Flowers of the orchid Disa unifloraare pollinated exclusively by the Mountain Pride butterfly (Meneris tulbaghia: Salyrinae). The genus Disa has undergone spectacular adaptive radiation in southern Africa. Phylogenetic analysis shows that shifts from one pollination system to another have been a major feature of evolutionary diversification in this genus. Image credit: Steve Johnson Link to larger JPEG of the image

Link to the American Journal of Botany abstract for the related article, see SD Johnson, HP Linder and KE Steiner: Phylogeny and radiation of pollination systems in DISA (Orchidaceae)

abot854 Cover Illustration V85.4: Brighamia rockii (Campanulaceae) in full flower at ka'aloa Peak, Moloka'i, Hawaii. Both members of this endemic Hawaiian genus, B. rockii rom Moloka'i and its sister species B. insignis from Kaua'i and Ni'ihau, are federally endangered. Image credit: Steven P. Perlman (Courtesy of National Tropical Garden, Lawai, Hawaii) Link to larger JPEG of the image

Link to the American Journal of Botany abstract for the related article, see Gemmill et al.: Conservation genetics of the endangered endemic Hawaiian genus Brighamia (Campanulaceae)

abot855 Cover Illustration V85.5: Arillate seeds of Cabralea canjerana (Meliaceae) are primarily disperesed by birds in the Atlantic forest of Brazil. However, hundereds of naturally fallen or partially eaten diaspores may be found on the forest floor with bits of aril attached. The red lipid-rich aril is highly attractive to ants, such as the large Odontomachus chelifer (size ~ 2cm). Aril removal by ants greatly facilitates seed germination. Image credit: M. A. Pizo. Link to larger JPEG of the image

Link to the American Journal of Botany abstract for the related article, see Pizo and Oliveira: Interaction between ants and seeds of a nonmyrmecochorous neotropical tree, Cabralea canjerana (meliaceae), in the Atlantic forest of southeast Brazil

abot856 Cover Illustration V85.6: The common sunflower, Helianthus annus L., from the Garden of the Gods in Colorado Springs, Colorado. Link to larger JPEG of the image

Link to the American Journal of Botany abstract for the related article, see AM Desrochers and LH Rieseberg: Mentor effects in wild species of Helianthus (Asteraceae)

abot856 Cover Illustration V85.ABSTRACTS: Black-eyed Susan, one of the many cultivators of Rudbeckia hirta L., the state flower of Maryland. Image credit: James Reveal, University of Maryland Link to larger JPEG of the image
abot857 Cover Illustration V85.7: A sample of the diversity of tubers oca, Oxalis tuberosa Molina, from the germplasm bank of PROINPA (Programa de la Investigacion de la Papa), Cochabamba, Bolivia. Image credit: Bill Mutch (MidCoast Photo Service) Link to larger JPEG of the image

Link to the American Journal of Botany abstract for the related article, see Emshwiller and Doyle: Origins of domestication and polyploid in oca (Oxalis tuberosa: Oxalidaceae): nrITS data

abot858 Cover Illustration V85.8: The Oak galls of the wasp Adleria weldi occur on one year-old acorns. Young, green galls secrete honeydew, but at maturity galls turn brown and drop from their host. Shown here on Quercus myrtifolia, this wasp also attacks Q. laurifolia in the southeastern United States. This species is incorrectly placed in Adleria and should be moved to the genus Andricus. Image credit: Warren G. Abrahamson Link to larger JPEG of the image

Link to the American Journal of Botany abstract for the related article, see WG Abrahamson, G Melika, R Scrafford and G Csoka: Gall-inducing insects provide insights into plant systematic relationships

White-flowered form of Syringa vulgaris from the Arnold Arboretum of harvard University.
Cover Illustration V85.9: White-flowered form of Syringa vulgaris from the Arnold Arboretum of harvard University. Several hundred cultivars of lilacs were developed from 22 wild species through extensive hybridizatino and artificial selection. The parentage of several of these hybrids was confirmed using restriction site analysis of both chloroplast and nuclear ribosomal DNA. Image credit: Ki-Joong Kim. Link to larger JPEG of the image

Link to the American Journal of Botany abstract for the related article, see Kim and Jansen: A chloroplast DNA phylogeny of licals (Syringa, Oleaceae): plastome groups show a strong correlation with crossing groups

Beetles are important pollinators in a lowland dipterocarp forest in Southeast Asia.
Cover Illustration V85.10: Beetles are important pollinators in a lowland dipterocarp forest in Southeast Asia. Most of canopy and emergent dipterocarps are pollinated by beetles feeding on floral tissues. Some understory trees and forest floor herbs are pollinated by different types of beetles. Homalomena propinqua (Araceae) is pollinated by two specias of beetles. One of them, Parastasia sp. (Scarabaeidae), stays inside the spathe chamber and feeds on staminodes. Link to larger JPEG of the image

Link to the American Journal of Botany abstract for the related article, see Momose et al.: Pollination biology in a lowland dipterocarp forest in Sarawak, Malaysia. I. Characteristics of the plant-pollinator community in a lowland dipterocarp forest.

Araucaria humboldtensis 
        (Araucariaceae) on the southern slope of Mt. Humboldt, New Caledone.
Cover Illustration V85.11: Araucaria humboldtensis (Araucariaceae) on the southern slope of Mt. Humboldt, New Caledone. New Caledonia possesses 13 endemics of Araucaria, and they form a monophyletic group with very low differentiation in rbcL sequences. Image credit: H. Setoguchi. Link to larger JPEG of the image

Link to the American Journal of Botany abstract for the related article, see Setoguchi et al.: Phylogenetic relationships within Araucariaceae based on rbcL gene sequences

Lady's slippers from a disjunt population 
        of the rare Cypripedium kentuckiense in Eastern Virginia.
Cover Illustration V85.12: Lady's slippers from a disjunt population of the rare Cypripedium kentuckiense in Eastern Virginia. Image credit: M. A. Case Link to larger JPEG of the image

Link to the American Journal of Botany abstract for the related article, see Case et al.: Conservation genetics and taxonomic status of the rare Kentucky lady's slipper: Cypripedium kentuckiense (Orchidaceae)

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