1996 Cover Stories

On this page we are pleased to provide you with explanations for the beautiful pictures that make up the covers for the American Journal of Botany, Volume 83 (1996). At present we the links to the abstracts are incomplete. We hope to have these connected over the next few weeks. We hope you enjoy the stories they tell and open up your possibilities for asking new questions! For members, the links created by the pictures take you back to the specific issue of the AJB.

abot831 Cover Illustration V83.1: Cross section of a mature leaf of Vigna mungo, immunolabelled using an antibody raised against soybean leaf vegetative storage protein 27/29 (VSP 27/29). Pink dots indicate where the VSP 27/29 is present, demonstrating its accumulation in a specialized tissue called the paravenial mesophyll is present in many legume species, a number of which have now been found to accumulate VSPs in this specialized tissue. A unique role in nitrogen assimilation and turnover is implicated for legume PVM. Composite of reflected image of silver-enhanced gold label (pink) and transmitted image of leaf cells (blue). Link to larger JPEG of the image

Link to the American Journal of Botany abstract for the related article, see Klauer et la.: Identification and localization of vegetative storage proteins in legume leaves

abot832 Cover Illustration V83.2: A myrmicine ant, Aphaenogaster araneoides,, carrying a seed of a neotropical understory herb, Calathea micans (Marantaceae). Ant-planted chasmogamous and cleistogamous seeds differed in establishment success in understory and gap sites. Image Credit: Helen Kennedy Link to larger JPEG of the image

Link to the American Journal of Botany abstract for the related article, see Le Corff: Establishment of chasmogamous and cleistogamous seedlings of an ant-dispersed understory herb, Calathea micans (Marantaceae)
 
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Cover Illustration V83.3: Computer-generated reconstruction from serial ultrathin sections showing the distribution of plastids within the egg cells of two genotypes of alfalfa. In the egg on the left, plastids (green) are positioned mostly below (toward the micropyle) the midtransverse region of the nucleus (blue) which results in the female plastids being largely sequested within the basal cell of the two-celled proembryo and not inherited. In the cell on the right, the plastids are perinuclear, thus, many female plastids become included in the apical cell of the two-celled proembryo and are inherited. Link to larger JPEG of the image

Link to the American Journal of Botany abstract for the related article, see Mogensen: The hows and whys of cytoplasmic inheritance in seed plants

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Cover Illustration V83.4: Cross section of Lilium at the tetrad stage stained with the PAS polysaccharide specific reaction. Soluble carbohydrates are detected within the locular fluid and the tapetum, whereas starch grains are accumlated in the outer anther wall layers (epidermis, endothecium, and middle layers). Link to larger JPEG of the image

Link to the American Journal of Botany abstract for the related article, see Clement, Burrus and Audran: Floral organ growth and carbohydrate content during pollen development in Lilium

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Cover Illustration V83.5: Gentiana sino-ornataBalf f. (Sect. Monopodiae) distributed in the mountains of southwest China and adjacent Burma, is one of the most magnificent gentians in the world. It was introduces into Europe in the early decades of this century and has contributed much to the botanical gardens of Europe. However, the individuals growing in their native land look more lovely. The photo was taken from Aba (3,200 m) Sichuan, China. Link to larger JPEG of the image

Link to the American Journal of Botany abstract for the related article, see Yuan, Kupfer and Doyle: Infrageneric phylogeny of the genus Gentiana (Gentianaceae) inferred from nucleotide sequences of the internal transcribed spacers (ITS) of nuclear ribosomal DNA

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Cover Illustration V83.6: Chamaecrista fasciculata. Link to larger JPEG of the image

Link to the American Journal of Botany abstract for the related article, see Shirley C. Tucker: Trends in evolution of floral ontogeny in Cassia sensu stricto, Senna, and Chamaecrista (Leguminosae: Caesalpinioideae: Cassieae: Cassiinae) a study in covergence

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Cover Illustration V83.6a: Ground level view of Mount St. Helens in August 1986. This picture shows the breach with the dome and erosion features and how the landscape is developing: plants are scarce. Image credit: Roger del Moral (University of Washington) Link to larger JPEG of the image
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Cover Illustration V83.7: Concentric rings of seed traps around individual parent plants of Lepidium campestre(Brassicaceae) used to document the distance and directional components of an individual's seed dispersion pattern in the absence of vegetation. Link to larger JPEG of the image

Link to the American Journal of Botany abstract for the related article, see Thiede and Augspurger: Intraspecific variation in seed dispersion of Lepidium campestre (Brassicaceae)

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Cover Illustration V83.8: The federally endangered green pitcher plant (Sarracenia oreophila Sarraceniaceae) in flower. Thirty-five populations of this insectivorous perennial species remain in the southeastern U.S. Allozyme diversity is low in this species; small populations and geographically disjunct populations maintain the least genetic diversity. Link to larger JPEG of the image

Link to the American Journal of Botany abstract for the related article, see Godt and Hamrick: Genetic structure of two endangered pitcher plants, Sarracenia jonesii and Sarracenia oreophila (Sarraceniaceae)

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Cover Illustration V83.9: Pollination drops inside an ovulate cone of Sequoiadendron These drops persist undisturbed during wet periods, since a water sheet forms on the wettable cone surface. Pollen capture resumes immediately after the cone dries. Link to larger JPEG of the image

Link to the American Journal of Botany abstract for the related article, see Takaso and Owens: Ovulate cone, pollination drop, and pollen capture in Sequoiadendron (Taxodiaceae)

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Cover Illustration V83.10: Whole mount of fragment of sporangial epidermis from a Sphagnum girgensohniicapsule subjected to high temperature acid hydrolysis. All cell walls have survived due to presence of resistant, autofluorescentwall compounds. Cell sizes,shapes, and patterns closely resemble those of Ordovician and later microfossils classified as "dispersed cuticles." This suggests that the mose ancient microfossils consisting of cellular sheets may represent some of the earliest known remains of plant sporophytic tissues. Link to larger JPEG of the image

Link to the American Journal of Botany abstract for the related article, see Kroken et al.: Occurrence and evolutionary significance of resistant cell wall in charophytes and bryophytes

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Cover Illustration V83.11: Pedicularis dasyantha in Svalbard, Norway. Link to larger JPEG of the image

Link to the American Journal of Botany abstract for the related article, see Odasz and Savolainen: Genetic variation in populations of the arctic perennial Pedicularis dasyantha (Scrophulariaceae), on Svalbard, Norway

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Cover Illustration V83.12: Portrait of Wilhelm Hofmeister (age unknown) orginally published in The plant World by Goebel, 1905. Link to larger JPEG of the image

Link to the American Journal of Botany abstract for the related article, see Kaplan and Cooke: The genius of Wilhelm Hofmeister: the orgin of causal-analytical research in plant development

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