PLANT SCIENCE BULLETIN

A Publication of the Botanical Society of America, Inc.

VOLUME 36, NUMBER 4, WINTER 1990
The Botanical Society of America: The Society for ALL Plant Biologists

THOMAS N. TAYLOR, Editor Department of Botany, Ohio State University, 1735 Neil Ave., Columbus, Ohio 43210 (614) 422-3564

Editorial Board
JUDITH A. JERNSTEDT Dept. of Agronomy & Range Science, University of California-Davis, Davis, California 95616
RUDY SCHMID Department of Botany, University of California, Berkeley, California, 94720
HARDY W. ESHBAUGH Department of Botany, Miami University, Oxford, Ohio 45056

PLANT SCIENCE BULLETIN (ISSN 0032-0919) is published four times per year by the Botanical Society of America, Inc., 1735 Neil Ave.. Columbus. OH 43210. Second class postage pending at Columbus. Ohio and additional mailing office. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Robert H. Essman, Botanical Society of America, 1735 Neil Ave.. Columbus. OH 43210.

A PUBLICATION OF THE BOTANICAL SOCIETY OF AMERICA

December, 1990 Vol. 36, No. 4

From the Editor

This will be the last issue of the Plant Science Bulletin that I will edit. I would like to thank all of you who assisted me in writing book reviews and providing other copy. I know that you will join me in wishing my successor, Dr. Meredith A. Lane, good luck in her term as editor. Send any copy for future issues of the Bulletin to:

Dr. Meredith A. Lane
University of Kansas Herbarium
2045 Constant Ave.
Lawrence, KS 66047

Thomas N. Taylor, Editor

Letter to the Editor

We are writing out of concern for the present and future vitality of scientific research at academic institutions in this country. Current levels of funding for research in ecology and evolutionary biology are woefully inadequate and threaten the nation's capacity to respond to the issues of global environmental change we are now facing and will be dealing with for decades to come. In fiscal year 1989, only 23.6% of all competitive proposals were funded in the Biotic Systems and Resources division of NSF. As many of the successful proposals were re-submissions, the percentage of first-time submissions funded was much lower. Particularly discouraging is the fact that only about 40% of proposals recommended for funding can actually be supported. The outlook for the immediate future is equally bleak. An investigator must write, on average, five or six proposals to secure funds for research. The energy devoted to preparing multiple grant proposals slows research progress tremendously and has an adverse effect on teaching, advising and morale.

Young, non-tenured scientists (a group which includes a large proportion of the minorities and women now in the field) are valuable role models and play significant roles in recruiting students into science. Some of these scientists are so discouraged about the prospects of obtaining funds for research that they are leaving research/teaching careers altogether, in favor of teaching-only or non-academic employment. Their frustration and discouragement is communicated all too clearly to their students who may, in turn, choose non-science related careers.

As "good science" in organismal biology often can be conducted on relatively modest budgets, we urge NSF to form a Small Grants program, which would fund smaller proposals ($10-25 K per year) with at least 50% of submissions being funded. By requiring low overhead rates (e.g., 10-20%) on such grants and setting maximum summer salaries at a level expected for a mid-level assistant professor, most of the money would go directly into the research. Small grants would, of course, be established as a supplement to the present funding system because there are obvious needs for large grants. At recent meetings of the Ecological Society of America and the American Institute of Biological Sciences, informal polls revealed strong support for such a program. Of the 114 people who responded, 111 were in favor of the initiative while only 3 were in opposition. (We thank everyone who participated in these surveys.)

The potential benefits of a Small Grants program include support of many meritorious researchers who currently are under-funded, the enhancement of science education through the improvement of morale among 'teaching-scientists," and the creation of undergraduate and graduate research opportunities. A Small Grants program would increase the predictability of funds and would allow more long-term research programs to be developed and sustained. It would also result in higher rates of recruitment and retention in the sciences. Finally, the program would enhance research efforts at many colleges and universities with strong commitments to teaching, where competent scientists find it hard to compete for funds in the present system.

We urge all readers of the Plant Science Bulletin who share our views to express their opinions to Dr. Mary Clutter (Director, Biological and Behavioral Sciences) or Dr. Patricia Werner (Director, Biotic Systems and Resources) at NSF, Washington, DC 20550. Now is an opportune time to communicate with NSF officers because plans are underway for major restructuring of the Foundation.

Scott Armbruster
University of Alaska, Fairbanks

Carol Butt
Louisiana State University

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BSA NEWS

1991 Young Botanist Recognition Awards

The Botanical Society of America requests nominations for the Young Botanist Recognition Awards for 1991. The purpose of these awards is to offer individual recognition to outstanding graduating seniors in the plant sciences and to encourage their participation in the Botanical Society of America. Award winners receive a Certificate of Recognition signed by the President of the Society and forwarded to the nominating faculty member for presentation.

Nominations should document the student's qualifications for the award and be accompanied by one or more letters of recommendation. Nominations should be sent to the Secretary: Gregory J. Anderson, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, 75 N. Eagleville Rd., The University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269-3043 by 1 April 1991.

Committees

The Society has 13 committees that attend to its concerns and interests (see pp. 90-91 of the Membership Directory and Handbook). If you would like to be considered for committee service, please contact the Chair of the Committee on Committees, William Louis Culberson, Department of Botany, Duke University, Durham, NC 27706.

Botanical Society Awards

The following prizes were awarded on 8 August 1990 at the dinner for all botanists given by the Botanical Society of America at its Annual Meeting held in Richmond, Virginia, in conjunction with the American Institute of Biological Sciences:

BSA Merit Awards

These awards are made to persons judged to have made outstanding contributions to botanical science. This year four botanists were selected:

Kenton L Chambers - Eminent biosystematist, internationally recognized for his studies of various genera of Asteraceae; a pioneer in the development of plant conservation in Oregon; stimulating teacher who has inspired many students to become botanists.

Bassett Maguire - Author of numerous and outstanding contributions to neotropical botany; explorer and plant collector in the "Lost World" of the Guiana Highlands; prime mover in the creation of the Intermountain Flora. He is the taxonomic authority on the family Clusiaceae.

Carlos A. Miller - Effective and dedicated teacher; patient and ingenious experimenter; co-discoverer of the nature of the cytokinins and of their interactions with auxin in the control of morphogenesis; co-author of one of the most cited papers in the field of plant physiology.

Philip Barry Tomlinson - A leading authority on plant form and structure, and one of the primary exponents of modern morphology and anatomy, with special emphasis on monocots and woody plants. Barry has served us as a model and an inspiration for investigating many neglected aspects of the botany of the tropics.

Charles Edwin Bessey Award

This award, given annually by the Teaching Section, recognizes outstanding contributions made to botanical instruction. This year, awards were presented to Barbara W. Saigo and Roy H. Saigo, University of Northern Iowa. Both recipients have given tirelessly of themselves in furthering botanical instruction, including leadership roles in the BSA Teaching Section and Education Committee.

Cichan Award

This was the first year that the Cichan Award was presented by the BSA. It was named in honor of the memory and work of Michael A. Cichan, who died in a plane crash in August of 1987. The award was established to encourage work by young researchers at the interface of structural and evolutionary botany. The award is given to a young scholar for a paper published during the previous year in the fields of evolutionary and/or structural botany. The award for 1990 was presented to Dr. Joanne M. Dannenhoffer for her paper, "Rellimia thomsonii from the Givetian of New York: secondary growth in three orders of branching," published in the American Journal of Botany, volume 76.

Isabel C. Cookson Paleobotanical Award

This award, given for the best contributed paper in paleobotany or palynology presented at the annual meeting, was given to Patrick Herendeen, Indiana University, for his paper, "Fossil history of the Leguminosae from the Eocene of southeastern North America."

George R. Cooley Award

This award is given annually by the American Society of Plant Taxonomists for the best paper in plant systematics presented at the annual meeting. This year the award was presented to Dr. Loren H. Rieseberg, Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden, for his paper, co-authored with Stephen M. Beckstrom-Sternberg, Aaron Liston, and Dulce Arias, "Phylogenetic and systematic inferences from chloroplast DNA, nuclear ribosomal DNA, and isozyme variation in Helianthus section Helianthus (Asteraceae)."

Darbaker Prize

This award is made for meritorious work in the study of microscopical algae. The recipient is selected by a committee of the BSA which bases its judgement primarily on papers published during the last two calendar years. The recipient of the 1989-1990 award was Dr. Peter Allan Silver, Connecticut College, New London, CT.

Ecological Section Award

This award, for the best student paper in ecology at the annual meeting, was presented to Paul Bradley of the University of South Carolina for his paper, "Effects of salinity on the kinetics of NH4 uptake in Spartinaalterniflora."

Katherine Esau Award

This award is given to the graduate student who presents the outstanding paper in developmental and structural botany during the annual meeting. The award is made from the interest on a gift from Dr. Esau. The award in 1990 was presented to Carlos Perez-Munoz of the Department of Agronomy and Range Science, University of California at Davis for his paper (with Barbara Webster), "Microtubules and exine wall pattern form in Vigna vexillata L."

Henry Allan Gleason Award

This award is given annually by the New York Botanical Garden in recognition of an outstanding recent publication in the field of plant taxonomy, plant ecology, or plant geography. The 1990 award goes to Dr. Tod Stuessy, The Ohio State University, for his book, Plant Taxonomy: The

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Systematic Evaluation of Comparative Data. This book will immediately take its place as the successor to the well-known Davis and Heywood text of 1963, Principles of Angiosperm Taxonomy. It provides a thorough, balanced approach, the first half on principles, the second on the data. Users will welcome the careful exposition of different points of view.

Jesse M. Greenman Award

This award is given by the Missouri Botanical Garden in recognition of the best paper published during the previous year based on a Ph.D. dissertation treating the systematics of vascular plants or bryophytes. The 1990 award was presented to Hector M. Hernandez for his publication, "Systematics of Zapoteca (Leguminosae)," published in the Annals of the Missouri Botanical Garden, volume 76.

Lawrence Memorial Award

This award, presented by the Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation, Carnegie Mellon University, is used to support travel for dissertation research of a doctoral candidate in systematic botany or horticulture, or the history of the plant sciences. The award for 1990 went to Chester E. Wilson. a student of James Thomson at the State University of New York at Stony Brook for his dissertation research. Mr. Wilson has undertaken a study of secondary sex characteristics in dioecious species of Polytrichaceae. The proceeds of the award will help support his travel in the U.S. and Europe for herbarium research.

Margaret Menzel Award

This award, given by the Genetics Section for an outstanding paper presented in the contributed papers sessions of the annual meeting, was presented to Jonathan F. Wendel, Iowa State University for his paper co-authored with James M. Stewart and Jeffrey H. Rettig, "Molecular evidence for the origin of Gossypium bickii via homoploid reticulate speciation."

Edgar T. Wherry Award

This award is given for the best paper presented during the contributed papers sessions of the Pteridological Section. The award recognizes Dr. Wherry's long term contribution to the floristics and patterns of evolution of ferns and was made this year to Judith E. Skog of George Mason University, Fairfax, VA for her paper, "The relationship of the fossil fern Schizaeopsis to Schizaea and Actinostachys."

Bylaws Changes

The following changes to the Bylaws were voted on and passed via mail ballot by the membership of the BSA early in the summer of 1990. They are reproduced here to make you aware of them. You may wish to insert them into your Membership Directory and Handbook since it will be two years before a new edition is produced incorporating these changes.

Gregory J. Anderson Secretary, BSA

Underlined areas represent additions, while strikeout and bracketed areas represent deletions to the Bylaws.

1. Title: Change [BY-LAWS] to BYLAWS, and make this change throughout the document where the word By-laws appears.

2. Table of Articles

Article VII. Council [Executive Committee]

Rationale: As revised here the Executive Committee is defined and described in Article X, 1. Furthermore, the title for Article VII already is simply: Council.

3. ARTICLE II. Membership and Dues

1.

(e) Retired Member. Any person retired from professional activities who has been a member of The Society for [the immediately preceding 20 years and who has reached the age of 65, or who, at any age, has paid annual dues for the immediately preceding 30 years] at least 25 years is eligible for one of the following categories of retired membership:

4. ARTICLE III. Officers

1. The Officers of The Society are: President, President-Elect, immediate Past President, Secretary, Treasurer, Program Director, Editor-in-Chief of the American Journal of Botany, Editor of the Plant Science Bulletin, and Manager of Publications. The Officers shall accept and conscientiously execute the duties specified in these Bylaws, or that custom and tradition dictate, for each respective office. Newly elected officers shall begin their terms of office immediately following the annual banquet, except as outlined in Article IV. 5. Newly appointed officers shall begin their terms of office on January 1. except asoutlined in Article IV. 5.

5. ARTICLE IV. Election and Appointment of Officers

1.

(c) The Election Committee prepares a slate of three names for each office. [to be filled as follows: To the names of the two persons receiving the highest numbers of votes in the member canvass for nominations, the committee adds one name of its choice.] The candidates for each office shall be selected from a combination ofpersons nominated by the membership at large andsuggested by the Election Committee.

6. (d) In the event of a tie vote, members of the Executive Committee [of-the-Council] and Election Committee vote among themselves until they have resolved the tie vote. The [C]chair[man] of the Election Committee conducts the voting.

7. (e) Results of the election are reported by the Election Committee [C]chair[man] to the President and to the Secretary of The Society. The Secretary promptly notifies each candidate of the outcome of the election. The President invites each officer-elect to attend the annual meeting of the Council of The Society. Results of the elections are announced to the membership at the annual business meeting and are published in the Plant Science Bulletin.

8. 2. [The] Selection of the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal is the responsibility of the [Council of The Society] Executive Committee. To fill a vacancy in this office, the President appoints a committee consisting of three members of The Society [with] and the incumbent Editor-in-Chief, ex officio. [The candidate recommended by the committee is confirmed by the Executive Committee of the Council of the Society.]

3. Selection of the Editor of the Plant Science Bulletin is the responsibility of the [Council of The Society] Executive Committee. To fill a vacancy in this office, the President appoints a committee consisting of three members of The Society [with] and the incumbent Editor, ex officio. [The candidate recommended by the committee is confirmed by the Executive Committee of the Council of The Society.]

4. [The] Selection of the Manager of Publications is carried out in the manner prescribed for the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal (Article IV. 2).

9. ARTICLE V. Duties of Elected Officers

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1. President. The President, as chief executive office of The Society, exercises the general supervision and management of The Society, and represents it as the occasion arises. The President presides at the annual business meeting, at meetings of [T] the Council, and of the Executive Committee and Management Committee, and at the annual banquet. The President performs such other duties and has such other responsibilities as are prescribed in these Bylaws and as may from time to time be assigned by the Executive Committee, Council, and the membership.

10. 2. President-Elect. The President-Elect performs any duties assigned by the President as well as chairing the Committee on Committees. [The President Elect is a member of the Ececutive Committee.] In addition, at the annual meeting in the year before he/she assumes the presidency, the President-Elect delivers to the membership assembled at the annual banquet a botanically-oriented address. If unusual circumstances prevail, the President-Elect and the President, in consultation with the Executive Committee [of the Council], may arrange for an appropriate alternative event. (See also Article IV. 5 of these Bylaws.)

11. 3. Past President. The immediate Past President performs any duties assigned by the President as well as chairing the Election Committee and the Corresponding Member Committee. [The-Past-President is a member of the Executive Committee.]

12. ARTICLE VII. Council

1. The Council consists of the President, President-Elect, immediate Past President, Secretary, Treasurer, Program Director, Editor-in-Chief of the American Journal of Botany, Editor of the Plant Science Bulletin, Manager of Publications, and the presiding officer or other elected representative of each Section.

3. [The former section under this number is moved to Article X, 1 and slightly revised.]

13. 3. The Council may establish standing committeeswhen necessary or abolish them as appropriate.

14. 4. The Council authorizes the publication of [any-or-all of] the following: revisions of the Bylaws of The Society and the Sections; minutes of the annual business meetings, including reports of the Treasurer and the Manager of Publications, American Journal of Botany, Plant Science Bulletin, a Directory of [names and addresses of the members with their Section affiliations and field of interest; The] Society members, a Careers in Botany booklet, Guide to Graduate Studies in Botany, and other official publications.

15. ARTICLE IX. Publications

1. The Journal

The American Journal of Botany is published regularly to disseminate the results of botanical research in all areas of interest to Society members. Editorial policy is established by an Editorial Committee of the American Journal of Botany. The Committee consists of the Editor-in-Chief, several Associate Editors selected by the Editor-in-Chief with the advice and consent of the Executive Committee [of the Council], the Secretary of The Society ex officio, and the Manager of Publications, ex officio. The Associate Editors are selected to provide expertise in the various disciplines represented by articles appearing in the Journal and serve five-year terms coincident with the term of the Editor-in-Chief.

16. ARTICLE X. Committees

1. Executive Committee. The President, President-Elect, immediate Past President, Secretary, Treasurer, Program Director, and one Council member elected by the Council for a one-year term constitute the Executive Committee [Executive Committee of the Council]. The Executive Committee [of the Council] acts on all interim matters that arise between regular annual meetings of the Society, and in such matters specifically assigned to it in these Bylaws: Article IV. 1(d), 2, 3, 4, 5; Article IX. 1; Article XV.

17. [(m)]2. Committee on Committees: consisting of the President-Elect as chair, the Secretary of The Society, ex officio, and six members, each serving three-year terms, two being appointed each year by this committee. The committee shall be responsible for the structural and functional aspects of The Society standing and temporary committees. It shall recommend names to the President-Elect for staffing yearly and unanticipated vacancies on these committees, giving consideration to: (1) balanced representation; (2) the number of committees and duties which a potential nominee is serving; (3) the principle of rotation of committee assignments; and (4) the responses from the membership to a periodic survey of member interests in and qualifications for service on a committee.

3. General committees. The President annually appoints the following standing general committees from among the members of The Society: Annual Meeting [Committee], Archives and History, Education, Election, Management, Membership and Appraisal. [At annual business meetings, members may direct the President to establish such additional standing committees as may seem appropriate or desirable.]

18. (a) Annual Meeting Committee: consisting of the Program Director as chair and the Secretary of each Section. This committee is charged with making arrangements, on behalf of The Society, for holding the annual meeting (Article V, [5]6).

(b) Archives and History Committee: consisting of the immediate Past-Secretary as chair and one or two other members appointed to five-year terms by the President after consultation with the chair[man] of the Historical Section. This committee ensures that such records of The Society as are of historical or archival interest are collected and organized in an orderly manner and deposited in an archival institution (currently the Library of the University of Texas at Austin) which will guarantee to curate and preserve the materials and make them available to The Society and qualified scholars.

(c) Conservation Committee: consisting of a chair[man] appointed by the President and five other members each serving three-year terms with two new members being appointed each year. This committee accumulates information on environmental problems, disseminates such information to the membership at its discretion, and brings matters of significance to the attention of the Council.

([f]e) Election Committee: consisting of the immediate Past President as chair, the Secretary of the Society, ex officio, and three members appointed by the President as specified in Article IV, 1(a) of these Bylaws.

19. ([g]f) Management Committee: consisting of the President as chair, the Manager of Publications, [Chair, the President, Treasurer, Secretary] Secretary, Treasurer, and three persons appointed by the President serving staggered three-year terms. The [C]committee will oversee the management of the [AJB] Journal, the investment and management of [BSA] funds of The Society, and subscription rates with the power to adjust rates as necessary.

20. ([j]g) Membership and Appraisal Committee: consisting of the Treasurer, Manager of Publications, ex officio, a chair and four other members appointed by the President for five-year terms, with one member appointed each year. This committee advises the President and the Council on policy matters pertaining to membership, to the effectiveness of Society organization and programming, and to professionalism among botanists.

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21. 4. Award committees. The President annually appointsthe following standing award committees from among themembers of The Society: Corresponding Members, MeritAwards, Darbaker Prize, Esau Award, and Pelton Award.

([d]a) Corresponding Members Committee: consisting of the immediate Past President as chair[man] and the two preceding Past Presidents. This committee makes recommendations to the Council in accordance with Article II, 1([e]d).

([k]b) Merit Awards: consisting of a chair[man] appointed by the President and two other members each serving three-year terms with one new member being appointed each year. The President of The Society is ex officio a member of the committee. Each year the committee selects one or more persons judged to have made outstanding contributions to botanical science, prepares a short citation for each awardee, and informs the Secretary of The Society of its selection(s) at least one month in advance of the meeting during which the awards are to be presented.

([e]c) Darbaker Prize: consisting of a chair[man], who is the senior appointed member, and two other members each serving three-year terms with one new member being appointed by the President each year. The committee selects a recipient, prepares a short citation, and informs the Secretary of The Society at least one month in advance of the meeting during which the award is to be presented. The prize is for meritorious work in the study of microscopic algae, is limited to residents of North America, and is based only on papers published in the English language.

([h]d) Esau Award: consisting of a chair[person] appointed by the President and two members, chosen by the President in consultation with the Developmental and Structural Section [C]chair, each serving three-year terms with one new member being appointed each year. The prize is awarded to a student who is the sole or senior author of a paper presented in the Developmental and Structural Section session of the annual meeting.

([l]e) Pelton Award: consisting of a chair[man] appointed by the President and two other members each serving three-year terms with one new member being appointed each year. When the Conservation and Research Foundation (Connecticut College, New London) informs The Society that the award is to be given, the committee selects the recipient, prepares a short citation, and informs the Secretary of The Society at least one month in advance of the meeting during which the award is to be presented. The award honors the memory of Jeanette Siron Pelton and was established by the Conservation and Research Foundation to provide a premium for sustained and imaginative productivity in experimental plant morphology.

[2. The Council established other standing committees from time to time an abolishes established committees as appropriate.]

22. ARTICLE XIII. Ammendments

   These Bylaws may be amended at any time only by mail ballot, [by three fourths of all members voting. Ballots must be mailed to those members entitled to vote not less than thirty days nor more than fifty days prior to an annual business meeting and must be returned to the Secretary at least fifteen days before the annual meeting during which the result of the voting is to be announced] with approval of three-fourths of those voting. All changes in the Bylaws [are published in the Plant Science Bulletin or are] will be reported at the next annual meeting and either published in the Plant Science Bulletin or promulgated separately to the membership.

23. ARTICLE XIV. General Prohibitions

3. Whereas The Society exists for scientific and educational purposes, it may engage in efforts intended better to inform the public on issues pertaining to plant science and the influences of plants on [mankind] people as an element in the biosphere. The Society, nevertheless, shall not allow any part of its activities to become those of lobbying or espousing particular scientific, economic, political, social, or religious doctrines or dogmas.

24. ARTICLE XV. Distribution on Dissolution

Upon dissolution of The Society, the Executive Committee [of the Council distributes] shall distribute the assets and accrued income to one or more scientific and educational organizations as the committee determines and as prescribed and limited in Article XIV of these Bylaws.

MEETINGS

Biogeochemistry of Wetlands

The Laboratory for Wetland Soils and Sediments, Louisiana State University, is sponsoring this symposium, to be held February 10-13, 1991 in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. The symposium will emphasize various biogeochemical processes occurring in freshwater and estuarine wetlands, including: 1) Elemental cycling in wetland ecosystems, 2) Plant/soil interactions in wetlands, 3) Toxic heavy metal behavior in wetlands, 4) Reactions of toxic organics in wetlands, 5) The use of wetland biogeochemical processes to characterize regulatory wetlands, 6) The role of wetlands in improving water quality, and 7) The role of wetlands in global climate change.   Registration ($95.00, $50.00 for graduate students) must be received by December 15, 1990 and abstracts are due January 15, 1991. For further information, contact: Karen Gros, Laboratory for Wetland Soils & Sediments, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803-7511 (504/388-8806, FAX 504/388-6423).

International Symposium on Biochemical MechanismsInvolved in Growth Regulation

This will be a joint meeting of the Phytochemical Society of Europe, Società Italiana di Fisiologia Vegetale and Società Italiana di Fitochimica and will be held in Milan in 1991. Topics include: hormones, membrane activities, environmental factors and many others. Poster sessions are planned along with workshops for special interest groups. For a copy of the first circular, please contact immediately: Dr. Donato Chiatante, Sez. Botanica Generale, Dip. Biologia, Via Celoria 26, Milan, Italy (FAX 02/23.61.070).

Prospects for Lupins in North America

A symposium on this topic will be held March 21-22, 1991 at the Ramada Hotel in St. Paul, Minnesota, sponsored by the University of Minnesota, Minnesota Extension Service and the Center for Alternative Plant and Animal Products. The purpose is to provide an opportunity for producers, researchers, instructors, extension specialists, agri-business personnel, and other interested individuals to share results and information on all aspects of lupins, from production to marketing and utilization. Extension, research and industry representatives are invited to give oral or poster presentations, or exhibits relating to lupin production, marketing and utilization. Send a proposed title and brief (4-5 sentence) summary by December 1, 1990. Final extended abstracts are due February 15, 1991. For further information, contact: Lynn Field, Department of Agronomy, 135 Crops Research, 1903 Hendon Avenue, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN 55108 (612/625-9765).

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International Organization of Plant Biosystematists Symposium

The next symposium of the IOPB will be held 15-18 June, 1992 at the Missouri Botanical Garden, St. Louis, hosted by Dr. Peter Raven. For further information, contact: Dr. Peter H. Raven, Missouri Botanical Garden, P.O. Box 299, St. Louis, MO 63166-0299, U.S.A. (Tel. 314/577-5100).

Ecology and Evolution of Plant Reproduction: New Approaches

This conference will be held in Athens, Georgia April 12-14, 1991. Topics to be covered include: constraints on the evolution of reproductive structures and functions; gene flow and pollen carryover; genetics of self-incompatibility; double fertilization-functional phylogenetic aspects; factors determining fruitset; pollen versus resource limitation; mixed-mating systems: do they exist?; male-male competition; female choice.   For further information contact: Dr. Robert Wyatt, Department of Botany, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (404/542-1842; FAX 404/542-1805).

Evolution of Aquatic Angiosperms

A full day symposium on the evolution of aquatic angiosperms, sponsored by the American Society of Plant Taxonomists, will be held during the American Institute of Biological Sciences meetings, 4-8 August, 1991, Convention Center and Trinity University, San Antonio, TX. Contributed papers and posters dealing with any aspects of aquatic angiosperm biology are invited to supplement the symposium in separate paper and poster sessions. For more information contact: C. Thomas Philbrick, Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden, N. College Ave., Claremont, CA 91711 (714/625-8767) or Donald H. Less, Department of Biological Sciences, P.O. Box 413, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53201 (414/229-6728).

10th Meeting of the Willi Hennig Society

This meeting will be hosted by the Royal Ontario Museum and the University of Toronto in Toronto, Canada, 16-19 August, 1991. The following symposia are planned: Randomization and Measures of Consistency (M.J. Donoghue), Phylogenetics and Heterochrony (R.J. Mooi), Phylogenetics and Evolution (D.R. Brooks), Biogeographic Consequences of an Expanding Earth (H. Owen), The Impact of Species Concepts and Hybrids and Phylogenetics (J. Lynch), and The Use of Cladistics in the Reconstruction of Past Diversities (J. Gauthier). As usual, contributed papers and posters are welcome. Further symposia can also be proposed, although this will mean doubling up of some sessions. Housing (with breakfast) in student residence will be available (about Can $45/single; $70/double). Registration fee is Can $70 (1/2 for students), banquet fee Can $30. Registration and housing forms may be obtained from R. Winterbottom, Dept. of Ichthyology & Herpetology, Royal Ontario Museum, 100 Queen's Park, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5S 2C6.

Origin of Anatomically Modern Humans

The 14th annual Spring Systematics Symposium on this topic will be held at the Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, Illinois on Saturday, May 11, 1991. Speakers include: Paul G. Bahn, Ofer Bar-Yosef, Rebecca Cann, Luigi L. Savalli-Sforza, Catherine Farizy, F. Clark Howell, Arthur J. Jelinek, Richard G. Klein, Yoel Rak, Olga Soffer-Bobyshev, Christopher Stringer, Erik Trinkaus and Linda Vigilant. For registration or more information, please contact: Sophia L. Brow, Symposium Coordinator, Department of Geology, Field Museum of Natural History, Roosevelt Road at Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, IL 60605-2496 (312/922-9410, ext 298)

1st International Crop Science Congress

This meeting will be held at the Iowa State Center, Ames, Iowa from 14-22 July 1992. For further information (to be issued in spring, 1991), contact: Kenneth Frey, Chair, International Crop Science Congress, c/o Agronomy Department, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011.

Physiology and Determination of Crop Yield

An International Symposium on this topic will be held at the University Centre Hotel, Gainesville, FL from 10-14 June 1991. For program information, contact: Dr. K.J. Boote, Agronomy Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (904/392-1811). To register ($100, $65 for graduate students) or for enrollment information, contact: Office of Conferences and Institutes, 551 IFAS, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-0551 (904/392-5930).

Tropical Crop Research and Biotechnology

An international symposium on this topic will be held in Trivandrum, Kerala, India in September, 1991 to inaugurate the formation of a new society: The International Society for Tropical Crop Research and Development (ISTCRAD). For further information, please contact: Dr. N. Krishnan Nayar, Professor & Head, Department of Agricultural Botany, College of Agriculture, Kerala Agricultural University, Trivandrum 695 522, India.

POSITION ANNOUNCEMENTS

Assistant or Associate Professor, Wood Anatomy

The Department of Forest Products, Oregon State University, has a 12-month tenure-track appointment available March 1, 1991. This position is teaching 1/3 time and research 2/3 time. The successful candidate would be expected to: develop an active research program in wood anatomy as it relates to utilization and tree growth, and supervise and guide graduate students; collaborate with other faculty on wood anatomy as it relates to their research; teach undergraduate and graduate courses in wood anatomy/identification and microtechnique; participate in continuing education short-courses and provide service as needed to the community and industry. Qualifications include a Ph.D. in wood science and technology, forest science, botany, horticulture, or a related discipline with emphasis on wood and plant anatomy. Basic skills are essential in microtechnique and light and electron microscopy. A knowledge of wood anatomy as it relates to utilization and tree growth is desirable. Send letter of application, curriculum vitae including list of transcripts and three letters of recommendation to: Dr. Robert Ethington, Head, Department of Forest Products, Oregon State University, Forest Research Lab 105, Corvallis, OR 97331-5709. Application closing date is January 2, 1991. Oregon State University is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity employer and complies with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. Oregon State University has a policy of being responsive to the needs of dual-career couples.

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Assistant Professor of Botany (Cellular Physiology)

The Department of Biological Sciences, University of Idaho has a tenure-track position available beginning August, 1991. The individual selected for this position will be expected to establish an independent, extramurally funded research program in cellular plant physiology. Specific teaching assignments will include an upper division course in basic plant physiology and one other course each year. The individual will be expected to train M.S. and Ph.D. students. Candidates must have a Ph.D. in an appropriate discipline, demonstrated research ability in plant biology including refereed publications, and demonstrated potential for excellence in teaching. Postdoctoral research, experience in obtaining extramural funding and teaching experience are desirable. A candidate whose research interests complement existing programs in the department is desired. Send curriculum vitae, statement of research interests, reprints, and statement of teaching experience and philosophy and have three letters of reference sent to: Dr. George Spomer, Chrm., Search Committee, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Idaho, Moscow, Idaho 83843. Closing date is December 15, 1990 or until a suitable candidate is found. The University of Idaho is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer and all women and members of minority groups are encouraged to apply.

Assistant Professor of Botany (Plant Development)

The Department of Biological Sciences, University of Idaho has a tenure-track position available beginning August, 1991. The individual selected for this position will be expected to establish an independent, extramurally funded research program in plant development. Specific teaching assignments will include an upper division course in plant development and one other course each year. The individual will be expected to train M.S. and Ph.D. students. Candidates must have a Ph.D. in an appropriate discipline, demonstrated research ability in plant biology including refereed publications, and demonstrated potential for excellence in teaching. Postdoctoral research, experience in obtaining extramural funding and teaching experience are desirable. A candidate using a molecular approach whose research interests complement existing programs in the department is desired. Send curriculum vitae, statement of research interests, reprints, and statement of teaching experience and philosophy and have three letters of reference sent to: Dr. George Spomer, Chrm., Search Committee, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Idaho, Moscow, Idaho 83843. Closing date is December 15, 1990 or until a suitable candidate is found. The University of Idaho is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer and all women and members of minority groups are encouraged to apply.

Cell Biologist

A new tenure track position at the Assistant Professor level is available at Western Kentucky University in Bowling Green, Kentucky. Research expertise in cell biology using electron microscopy is desired. Applicants should have a Ph.D. and postdoctoral research experience is preferred. Teaching responsibilities include cell biology and introductory biology courses. In addition, involvement in an EM course and the department's EM facility (three TEM's and one SEM) will be required. Development of a research program involving undergraduate and MS graduate students in the specialty is expected. Review of applications will begin January 1, 1991 and continue until the position is filled with an expected date of appointment by August 15, 1991. Send letter of application, curriculum vitae, statement of research and teaching goals, and the names and addresses of three references to: Office of Academic Affairs, Biology Search, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY 42101. Women and minorities are encouraged to apply. An affirmative action/equal opportunity employer.

Plant Molecular Biology

The Department of Biology, University of Montréal is seeking a candidate for a tenure-track position in plant molecular biology. The successful candidate will be expected to teach molecular biology to students of biology, maintain an innovative research program, and obtain grant funding for research. We hope to recruit a scientist involved in the molecular basis of cell differentiation and flower development to become part of a team that includes a plant anatomist/histochemist and a floral induction physiologist. This team will join the Research Institute on Plant Biology located on the site of the Montréal Botanical Garden, the third largest of its kind in the world. The newly created Institute includes a dozen plant scientists and is growing rapidly, with new facilities being built and 3 more tenure track positions being offered over the next 24 months. The Université de Montréal is a French-speaking environment and therefore tenure is linked with the capacity to teach in French. A scientist who does not speak French from the beginning would be given some time to learn the language. Please send a letter of presentation, curriculum vitae and 3 letters of recommendation before December 31, 1990 to: Dr. R. McNeil, Directeur, Dép. de sciences biologiques, Université de Montreal, C.P. 6128 Succ. "A", Montréal, Qc, Canada H3C 3J7.

Plant Physiologist

The Botany Department at the University of Rhode Island seeks a plant physiologist broadly educated in the botanical sciences to fill a tenure-track position at the assistant professor level beginning 1 September 1991. The successful candidate will be expected to establish a vigorous research program centered around the physiology of vascular plants that will attract external funding. Teaching responsibilities include courses in introductory plant biology and plant physiology, and an advanced course in the candidate's area of expertise. Candidates must have a Ph.D. in the biological sciences, skills necessary for effective teaching, and an established record of quality research and publication. Postdoctoral experience is preferred. Applicants should submit a statement of research interests, curriculum vitae, official undergraduate and graduate transcripts, and the names, addresses, and phone numbers of four persons who may be contacted as referees to: Search Committee Chair, Botany Department, The University of Rhode Island, P.O. Box G, Kingston, RI 02881. Review of applications will begin 17 December 1990 and continue until the position is filled. The University of Rhode Island encourages applications from women and minorities, and is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer.

Plant Structural Biology

Northeast Missouri State University is seeking a botanist with demonstrated interest and training in plant structural biology for a tenure-track position, salary and rank dependent upon qualifications. Teaching responsibilities will include introductory and advanced courses in botany, as well as rotation into introductory biology (for majors and nonmajors). The successful candidate will show strong potential as a teacher and enthusiastically involve undergraduates and graduate

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students in research. Laboratory space, basic instrumentation, and initial funding for research will be provided. Candidate must have completed the Ph.D., possess an excellent undergraduate record from a liberal arts and sciences institution, strong graduate experiences, and display leadership and service qualities. Please send a letter of application stating your teaching and research goals, a curriculum vitae, undergraduate and graduate transcripts, and three letters of recommendation to: Dr. L. Scott Ellis, Division of Science, Northeast Missouri State University, Kirksville, MO 63501 (816/785-4597). Applications will be reviewed beginning November 30, 1990. Women and minorities are strongly urged to apply.

Plant Systematics

Northeast Missouri State University is seeking a botanist with demonstrated interest and training in classical and modern approaches to plant systematics for a tenure-track position. Teaching responsibilities will include introductory and advanced courses in botany, including local flora, as well as rotation into introductory biology (for majors and nonmajors). The successful candidate will show strong potential as a teacher and enthusiastically involve undergraduates and graduate students in research and should be committed to maintaining and expanding the university's herbarium that presently contains approximately 19,000 specimens. Laboratory space, basic instrumentation, and initial funding for research will be provided. Candidate must have completed the Ph.D., possess an excellent undergraduate record from a liberal arts and sciences institution, strong graduate experiences, and display leadership and service qualities. Please send a letter of application stating your teaching and research goals, a curriculum vitae, undergraduate and graduate transcripts, and three letters of recommendation to: Dr. L. Scott Ellis, Division of Science, Northeast Missouri State University, Kirksville, MO 63501 (816/785-4597). Applications will be reviewed beginning November 30, 1990. Women and minorities are strongly urged to apply.

Professor or Associate Professor of Ecology

The University of Hawaii at Manoa is seeking a Professor or Associate Professor in the Department of Botany to begin August 1, 1991. The candidate would be expected to participate in 3 courses per year and assume a role of professional leadership in the department and in research. Candidate must have a strong field orientation and bring modern approaches and techniques to the study of mechanisms in the ecology and evolution of Hawaiian terrestrial ecosystems and species. Qualifications are a Ph.D. in Botany or Plant Biology with evidence of excellence in at least 4 years of full-time university level teaching at the rank of Associate Professor or equivalent (for Professor position) or 4 years at Assistant Professor level or equivalent (for Associate Professor position). Research productivity should be recognized internationally by a continuing publication record. Evidence of professional service is also required. Send letter of application including a statement of proposed research program, resume, and names of 3 references to: Chair, Ecology Search Committee, Department of Botany, University of Hawaii at Manoa, 3190 Maile Way, Honolulu, Hawaii 96822 (FAX: 808/956-3923). Closing date: January 4, 1991. An Equal Opportunity Employer.

Field Collecting Position Available

The Smithsonian Institution Department of Botany has a field collector position available in the Biological Diversity of the Guianas Program (minimum of 18-24 months in the Guianas).   Beginning in June of 1991 the individual selected will spend the remainder of 1991 through early 1993 in the Guianas collecting plant specimens, and 1-2 months in Washington, D.C. helping to identify the collections. For technical information contact C.L. Kelloff, Biological Diversity of the Guianas Program, Department of Botany, NHB# 166, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC 20560 (202/786-2518; FAX 202/786-2563). For other information, contact Program Director Dr. V.A. Funk (202/357-2560). This position is open to all qualified individuals and will remain so until a suitable person is found. The Smithsonian is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

Postdoctoral Research Associate

A postdoctoral research associate position to study RFLPs in hops is available at the Washington State University, Irrigated Agriculture Research and Extension Center at Prosser, Washington. Immediate project objectives are to continue DNA probe development, screen germplasm for RFLPs, and apply RFLP markers to breeding for resistance to hop aphid and brewing quality. Qualifications include a Ph.D. in plant breeding, genetics, or related field and experience with RFLP technology. Additional knowledge of the genetic and statistical analysis of molecular marker data and its application to germplasm improvement is preferred. Twelve-month appointment with likelihood of renewal. Competitive salary and fringe benefits. Send letter of application, resume, transcripts, and have three letters of reference sent by 1 February 1991 to: Dr. Stephen T. Kenny, Irrigated Agriculture Research and Extension Center, Washington State University-Prosser, Rt. 2 Box 2953-A, Prosser, WA 99350 (Tel 509/786-2226). WSU employs only U.S. citizens and lawfully authorized non-U.S. citizens. All new employees must show employment eligibility verification as required by the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service. WSU is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Educator and Employer. Protected group members are encouraged to apply.

Smithsonian Institution Fellowships

The Smithsonian Institution announces its research fellowships for 1991-1992 in the fields of History of Science and Technology, Social and Cultural History, History of Art, Anthropology, Biological Sciences, Earth Sciences and Materials Analysis. Smithsonian fellowships are awarded to support independent research in residence at the Smithsonian in association with the research staff and using the Institution's resources. Predoctoral and postdoctoral fellowship appointments for 6-12 months and graduate student appointments for 10 weeks are awarded. Proposals for research in the following areas may be of interest to PSB readers: History of Science and Technology: History of computers, communication, and society; history of agriculture; air and space; electrical technology, engineering; industrial archaeology; mathematics; medicine and pharmacy; natural history; physical sciences; social dimensions of science and technology; and transportation.

Biological Sciences: Animal behavior and pathology; ecology; environmental studies; evolutionary biology; marine biology; natural history; paleobiology; systematics; and tropical biology.

Earth Sciences: Meteoritics; mineralogy; paleobiology, petrology; planetary geology; sedimentology; and volcanology.

Applications are due January 15, 1991 and are based on merit. Fellowships are open to all qualified individuals without reference to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, or condition of handicap of any applicant. For more information and application forms, please write:

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Smithsonian Institution, Office of Fellowships and Grants, Suite 7300, 955 L'Enfant Plaza, Washington, DC 20560 (2021287-3271, 3321). Please indicate the particular area in which you propose to conduct research and give the dates of degrees received or expected.

Smithsonian Minority Internship Program

Internships, offered through the Office of Fellowships and Grants, are available for periods of 9-12 weeks during the summer, fall, and spring. Minority undergraduate and graduate students are invited to apply. The appointment carries a stipend of $250 per week for undergraduate and $300 per week for graduate students, and provides a travel allowance. For applications and deadline information, please write: Smithsonian Institution, Office of Fellowships and Grants, Suite 7300, 955 L'Enfant Plaza, Washington, DC 20560.

Summer Fellowship in Field Biology

Iowa Lakeside Laboratory announces the Founder's Fellowship for the summer of 1991 in field biology for predoctoral students or recent Ph.D. graduates. The stipend is $2,000, no tuition; fellows pay modest fees for room/board and lab space. A candidate's work should have a component for which a summer at the lab would be especially profitable. The 55 hectare lab is located on glacial terrain on the western shore of deep West Okoboji Lake. Many small lakes, wetlands, prairies, streams and woodlands are nearby. Potential applicants should contact the director and/or send an application which will include a cover letter, vitae, and a 1-2 page synopsis of the proposed project. Specific reasons why the station is particularly suitable are critical to the application. Two letters are requested, including one from the research advisor. Applications will be accepted up to April 1, 1991. Please contact: Robert W. Cruden, Acting Director, Department of Botany, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

Tropical Botany--An Educational Opportunity

Harvard University Summer School, in collaboration with Fairchild Tropical Garden, Miami, Florida, will again offer Biology S-105, "Plants of the Tropics" with P.B. Tomlinson, Jeffrey Professor of Biology, Harvard University, as instructor. The course will be held June 10-July 5, 1991 in Miami. Instruction is carried out within the educational facilities of Fairchild Tropical Garden with access to its living collections, which constitute the largest collection of tropical plants in the continental United States. Field instruction will further involve the diversity of natural ecosystems in South Florida, where the vegetation has a strong tropical facies. Emphasis will be on structural biology but with a strong systematic orientation. The objective of the course is to provide advanced students of botany with a guided introduction to the diversity of plant form in the lowland tropics. This should be of value to students who wish to broaden their familiarity with the world's flora and prepare such students for direct contact with tropical vegetation. Estimated expenses are tuition ($1,025.00), application and other fees ($60.00), and cost of food and dormitory accommodation in Miami (about $30.00 per day). Applications should be made before the early deadline of March 31, 1991 to: Environment and Field Biology, Department FB, Harvard University Summer School, 20 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138. For further details on prerequisites and scholarship support, contact: Professor P.B. Tomlinson, Harvard Forest, Petersham, MA 01366.

International Organization of Plant Biosystematists, 1989-1992

Participants from 30 different countries attended the five day IOPB symposium, July 10-14, 1989, organized under the Chairmanship of Soichi Kawano, Kyoto University, and held at the Kyoto Municipal Hall, Kyoto. Highlights of the Symposium included 22 papers by invited speakers; three poster sessions with a total of 102 posters, a full-day field trip to Nara, and a three-day post-symposium excursion to Tateyama. Like the preceding IOPB Symposia, the 1989 Symposium helped to weld friendships and initiate collaboration in research, especially between field and laboratory oriented workers. Membership fees for the IOPB for 1990-1992 are US $25.00 and may be sent to the Secretary-Treasurer, Dr. H.C.M. den Nijs, Hugo de Vries Laboratorium, Biologisch Centrum Anna's Hoeve, Universiteit Van Amsterdam, Kruislaan 318, 1098 SM Amsterdam, The Netherlands (Tel. (020)525.7660; FAX (31 20)525.7715). Institutional fees are US $10.00 annually. Past president, Dr. K. Urbanska, has initiated an informal "Arctic-Boreal-Alpine Plant Biology" working group within the IOPB framework. For more details, contact: Dr. K. Urbanska, Geobotanisches Institut, Stiftung Rubel, Zurichbergstrasse 38, CH-8044 Zurich, Switzerland (Tel. 01/256 38 77; FAX. 01/252 01 92). Information for the IOPB newsletter should also be sent to Dr. Urbanska.

Eminent Ecologist Seminar Series

As part of the summer academic field ecology program, Michigan State University's W.K. Kellogg Biological Station is pleased to announce the speakers for this year's Eminent Ecologist Seminar Series (Bot/Zol 891): Jim Brown (University of New Mexico) on Long Term

Experiments in Community Ecology and Macroecology:

The Assembly of Continental Biotas (July 1-July 5). Astrid Kodric-Brown (University of New Mexico) on Mating Systems and Sexual Selection (July 1-July 5)

John Endler (University of California, Santa Barbara) on Ambient Light Effects on Color Pattern Selection and Implications of the Color of Forest Light (July 15-19)

Russ Schmitt (University of California, Santa Barbara) on Indirect Effects in Marine Communities (July 29-August 2)

Sally Holbrook (University of California, Santa Barbara) on Behavioral Ecology of Marine Fishes (July 29-August 2)

Peter Vitousek (Stanford University) on Population-Ecosystem Interactions (August 12-16)

Pam Matson (NASA Ames Research Center) on Atmosphere-Biosphere Interactions (August 12-16)

In addition to this special seminar course, a variety of field ecology courses are also available this summer. Through the field-trip format, students get a first-hand look at the ecological diversity in the Michigan Great Lakes Region. The 1991 courses include: Field Plant Systematics, Comparative Limnology, Invertebrates, Ornithology, Topics in Conservation Biology, Scientific Illustration, Outdoor Environmental Studies, Animal Ecology, Aquatic & Wetland Plants, Plant Ecology, Ecology of Zooplankton, Plant Population Biology, Scientific Photography, and Global Change Seminar. Courses run for 5 weeks, from June 19-July 23 or from July 25-August 28. There are several part-time, on-site paid positions available to assist students with financial need. There are also scholarships available. For information, contact: Jan Eberhardt, Academic Coordinator, Room 3, Natural Science Bldg., Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (517/355-1284).

Summer Field Courses, 1991

The Mountain Lake Biological Station offers a summer program of study and research in environmental and

9

evolutionary biology. Situated at an elevation of 4,000 ft. in the Allegheny Mountains of southwestern Virginia, the station draws faculty and students from across the nation. Students may pursue the master's degree in biology by summer study, a program that is particularly suitable for teachers in secondary education.

First (June 9-July 13, 1991) and instructors include:

Mammalogy (Jack A. Cranford, Virginia Polytechnic Inst. & State Univ.)

Animal Behavior (Robert G. Jaeger, Univ. of SW Louisiana) Ecological Genetics (David A. West, VPI & SU)

Second term (July 14-August 17, 1991) courses and instructors:

Plant Taxonomy (Spencer Tomb, Kansas State University)

Community Ecology (Joseph Travis, Florida State Univ. and Mark A. McPeek, Archbold Biological Station)

Workshop in Electrophoresis (July 14-27) (Charles R. Werth, Texas Tech Univ.)

Workshop in Molecular Techniques for Field Biology (July 28-August 17) (Michael P. Timko and Daniel J. Burke, Univ. of Virginia)

Scholarships are available for room and board, as well as tuition expenses. For further information, contact: Director, Mountain Lake Biological Station, Gilmer Hall, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22901 (804/924-3151).

Microinjection Techniques in Cell Biology

This research-oriented course will be held May 26-June 1, 1991 at the Woods Hole Marine Biological Laboratory and is intended for graduate students, postdoctoral researchers, and investigators (limited to 24 students). Microinjection techniques have developed to a state that permits investigators to bridge the gap between in vivo and in vitro biochemistry. The combination of microinjection with analytical light microscopic methodologies, electrophysiological and photometric approaches offers an unparalleled view of cellular function and mechanisms of action within the cytoplasm of intact, living cells. This short course will provide an opportunity to learn techniques of microinjection into a variety of living cells form leading practitioners. The course will consist of lectures, demonstrations, and extensive hands-on laboratory exercises. The student will learn to microinject single cells, including, but not limited to: cultured mammalian cells, amphibian oocytes, echinoderm blastomeres, and various plant cells. In addition, many of the latest methods of light microscopy, including the use of fluorescence and video techniques, will be used in conjunction with microinjection. The faculty is drawn from the academic and industrial communities. Tuition is $1,450 (includes room and board) and application deadline is March 20, 1991. For further information and applications, contact: Ms. Florence Dwane, Admissions Coordinator, Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, MA 02543, U.S.A. (508/548-3705, ext. 216).

Cycad '90

Cycad '90 was held in Townsville, Queensland, Australia 22-28 July 1990. The proceedings will be published in 1991. If you are interested in obtaining a copy of this volume, please contact: Dr. Knut J. Norstog, Box 141 Route 4, Waterloo, IA 62298.

Scholarships in Tropical Botany

The Garden Club of America is offering two $5,000 awards to assist with field work in the area of tropical botany. Awards will be made on a competitive basis to graduate students conducting field work in the tropics as part of their doctoral dissertation research. The awards will be made on a one-time basis, and applications are due by December 31, 1990. Recipients will be announced by March 15, 1991. There is no application form, however, students must include the following: 1) a curriculum vitae, including graduate and undergraduate transcripts; 2) evidence of foreign language capability; 3) a two-page outline of the proposed research; 4) a letter stating his or her plans for the future. A long term commitment to conservation of tropical forests and an intent to work in the area will add merit to the application; and 5) a letter of recommendation from the advisor, which should include an evaluation of the student's progress to date. U.S. citizenship is not a requirement, however, students must be enrolled in a U.S. university to be eligible for this scholarship. Please mail applications to: Jane MacKnight, World Wildlife Fund/Garden Club of America, Scholarships in Tropical Botany, World Wildlife Fund, 1250 24th St., NW, Washington, DC 20037.

Request for Research Sites to Study Uvularia

In the spring of 1991, Shoichi Kawano (Kyoto University) and I will begin a 2-3 year study of the five genera in the genus Uvularia (U. perfoliata, U. grandiflora, U. puberula, U. sessilifolia, U. floridana). The project will focus on life history and resource allocation strategies over the geographic range of each species. We are seeking sites where we can make in situ measurements and would also like to collect small numbers of plants that would be grown in a common garden environment at SERC. If you know of potential sites, especially sites where two or more of the species can be found, please contact Dennis Whigham at: Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, Box 289, Edgewater, MD 21037 (301/798-4424).

BOOKS RECEIVED

Westoby, J. Introduction to Forestry: People and Their Trees. Basil Blackwell, Inc., 432 Park Ave. South, Suite 1503, New York, NY 10016, 1989. vii + 228 p. ISBN 0-6341-16133-3, 0-631-16134-1 (pbk.). Price: $55.00.

Wickens, G.E., J.R. Gooding and D.V. Field, eds. Plants for Arid Lands. Unwin Hyman Inc., 8 Winchester Pl., Winchester, MA 01890, 1989. xiv + 452 p. ISBN 0-04-445-330-2. Price: $29.95.

Woodman, W.F., M.C. Shelley and B.J. Reichel. Biotechnology and the Research Enterprise: A Guide to the Literature. Iowa State Univ. Press, 2121 S. State Ave., Ames, IA 50010, 1989. xviii + 358 p. ISBN 0-8138-0164-8. Price: $49.95.

Wright, C.J. Manipulation of Fruiting. Butterworths & Co., 80 Montvale Ave., Stoneham, MA 02180, 1989. vii + 414 p. ISBN 0-408-02608-1. Price: $185.00.

Wu, R., L. Grossman and K. Moldave. Recombinant DNAMethodology. Academic Press, Inc., 1989. xxxi + 760 p. ISBN 0-12-765560-3. Price: $49.95.

Wynn, T. Test Bank to Accompany: Plants, Their Biology and Importance. Harper & Row, Inc., 10 E. 53rd St., New York NY 10022, 1990. 362 p. ISBN 0-06-363579-8. Price: none given.

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