2011 Triarch "Botanical Images"
Student Travel Award

The Botanical Society of America welcomes you to the fifth annual Triarch "Botanical Images" Student Travel Award entries. From the vibrant microscopy images to those depicting entire ecosystems, pictures are always an enticing way to learn and teach. We trust you will enjoy the results and in the process learn a bit more about plants!

» View Past Award Recipients and Submissions

2011 Submissions for the Conant "Botanical Images" Student Travel Award
Valentin Barca, Carol Davila University of Medicine and Pharmacy - #26, #27, #28, #29, #30, #31  |  Julie Bergene, University of Kansas - #16, #17  |  Cassandra Coleman, University of Alabama - #3, #4, #5, #6, #7, #8  |  Alan Franck, University of South Florida - #15  |  Md Shahadat Hossan, University of Bedfordshire - #18  |  Irma Ortiz, UCLA - #24  |  Pamela Puppo, University of Porto - #9, #10, #11, #12  |  Ratnaprabha Ratnaprabha, Texas A&M University - #1  |  Jon Richey, Texas State University - San Marcos - #2  |  James Riser, Washington State University - #20, #21, #22, #23, #25  |  Allison Schwartz, University of California, Los Angeles - #13  |  Derek Shiels, Central Michigan University - #19  |  Tomas Zavada, University Of Massachusetts, Boston - #14

Submission #1
Title: Rice seedling roots
Author: Ratnaprabha Ratnaprabha
Institution: Texas A&M University
Department: Molecular & Environmental Plant Sciences
Family: Poaceae
Taxon: Oryza sativa
Common Name: rice
Season/time of year: Spring 2011
Area: Beaumont
State/Province: Texas Country: United States
Longitude: 94? 6' 6" WLatitude: 30? 5' 8" N
Additional Information:

Click Here for a Larger Version
Back to Image Index
Caption: Rice seedling roots (3-week old) in hydroponics medium
Scientific Description/Explanation: Roots are the gateways for water, nutrients and minerals and hence, hold a major key to all growth, physiological and developmental processes in plant parts aboveground. Unlike any plant, rice roots are fibrous, adventitious and semi-aquatic (with aerenchyma) in nature. Research on roots are often neglected because it is laborious, time consuming, expensive and demands sophisticated technology. Regardless of numerous studies on above ground plant parts (shoots, leaves, flowers and fruits), research is incomplete without roots in the picture. My research is focussed on studying root morphological & physiological bases to understand genotypic control of nutrient acquisition in rice grains. This will assist breeding of rice varieties with enhanced nutrient uptake to improve grain nutrient quality and thus, alleviate nutrient malnutrition.

 

Submission #2
Title: Fossil Lauraceous Cuticle of Late Cretaceous Age
Author: Jon Richey
Institution: Texas State University - San Marcos
Department: Department of Biology
Family: Lauraceae
Taxon: N/A
Common Name: N/A
Season/time of year: Late Cretaceous
Area: Starkville South Locality, Vermejo Formation
State/Province: Colorado Country: USA
Longitude: 105 degreesLatitude: 37 degrees
Additional Information: photographed via light microscopy with a digital camera

Click Here for a Larger Version
Back to Image Index
Caption:
Scientific Description/Explanation: My research involves the use of fossil plants to infer CO2 levels the Late Cretaceous and Early Tertiary. Specifically, I am using the Stomatal Index Method. Stomatal index is the ratio of stomata (gas exchange pores in plants) to total epidermal cells, which is inversely proportional to atmospheric CO2. To state it simply, in times of low CO2, plants need less stomata to take in the same amount of CO2, and vice versa. This is a simple and useful proxy to illuminate CO2 in deep geologic time, which is extremely important given the current trend of rising CO2 due to human causes. This picture is one of many thousands I have taken in order to count stomata and epidermal cells. Even though this is not my study plant (though it is the same family), i think that this cuticle makes particularly beautiful biological art.

 

Submission #3
Title: A Delicate Balance in a Dangerous Place
Author: Cassandra Coleman
Institution: University of Alabama
Department: Biological Sciences
Family: Gesneriaceae
Taxon: Neomortonia rosea
Common Name:
Season/time of year:
Area: Lita
State/Province: Country: Ecuador
Longitude: Latitude:
Additional Information:

Click Here for a Larger Version
Back to Image Index
Caption: A new morning for N. rosea
Scientific Description/Explanation: Neomortonia rosea is one of two species in the paraphyletic genus Neomortonia. A small and delicate plant, it has eluded scientists to it's correct placement, both morphologically and molecularly. Growing on wet rock cliffs, N. rosea prospers in northwest Ecuador and into Colombia in areas both difficult and dangerous to visit.

 

Submission #4
Title: Fuzzy on the outside, Leopard on the inside
Author: Cassandra Coleman
Institution: University of Alabama
Department: Biological Sciences
Family: Gesneriaceae
Taxon: Kohleria villosa
Common Name:
Season/time of year:
Area: Reserva Los Cedros
State/Province: Country:
Longitude: Latitude:
Additional Information:

Click Here for a Larger Version
Back to Image Index
Caption: A common, yet beautiful flower in the Western Andes
Scientific Description/Explanation: Kohleria villosa litters the many hills of Reserva Los Cedros. Covered in silky trichomes, this variable species shows bright coloration both inside and out. The inside of the flower gives a startling contrast in yellow with brown spots. A small plant often lost underfoot in the forest, this species uses this unusual and bright coloration to better attract pollinators.

 

Submission #5
Title: Prominent Pink Pouches
Author: Cassandra Coleman
Institution: University of Alabama
Department: Biological Sciences
Family: Gesneriaceae
Taxon: Gasteranthus quitensis
Common Name:
Season/time of year:
Area: Western Andes
State/Province: Country:
Longitude: Latitude:
Additional Information:

Click Here for a Larger Version
Back to Image Index
Caption: G. quitensis waits for pollinators
Scientific Description/Explanation: Gasteranthus quitensis can be found throughout much of the western Andes. It's brightly colored flowers, seen in varying tones of pink, and it's wild calyxes serve to attract pollinators. Hummingbirds can be seen visiting these flowers, whose restrictive necks keep many bees out. These small plants put on quite a floral show, and for good reason! A flower may only get one hummingbird visit in it's lifetime, if even that.

 

Submission #6
Title: A Hairy Rarity
Author: Cassandra Coleman
Institution: University of Alabama
Department: Biological Sciences
Family: Gesneriaceae
Taxon: Gasteranthus imbaburensis
Common Name:
Season/time of year:
Area:
State/Province: Country:
Longitude: Latitude:
Additional Information:

Click Here for a Larger Version
Back to Image Index
Caption: G. imbaburensis, a new and highly endemic species
Scientific Description/Explanation: Gasterathus imbaburensis is named for the Ecuadorian province it is found in, Imbabura. But in reality, this specie's known growing range is much smaller, a single hillside in the biological station Reserva Los Cedros. A few hours hiking up a steep mountain is the cost to see or study this highly endemic species with it's unique trichomes. G. imbaburensis is a beautiful flowering plant that greatly benefits from the cloak of conservation it has in Reserva Los Cedros. Without such conservation efforts, deforestation of one small hillside would cause extinction for this uncommon species.

 

Submission #7
Title: A Dramatic Fruit on Drymonia brochidodrama
Author: Cassandra Coleman
Institution: University of Alabama
Department: Biological Sciences
Family: Gesneriaceae
Taxon: Drymonia brochidodrama
Common Name:
Season/time of year:
Area: Western Andes
State/Province: Country:
Longitude: Latitude:
Additional Information:

Click Here for a Larger Version
Back to Image Index
Caption: The flower may be beautiful, but it's the fruit that's a real show stopper.
Scientific Description/Explanation: When in bloom, Drymonia brochidodrama displays a bright white flower with a yellow throat. What is pictured, though colorful, is not the flower, but the fruit of that pollinated flower. Even when in fruit this plant can't help but to be the brightest and most colorful around. Once the flower has died off, it leaves behind a ripening red fruit that, when ripe, slowly splits open to reveal a bright blue ball of seeds. One form of fruit type, this "fleshy capsule" can be seen in different species of Drymonia.

 

Submission #8
Title: Columnea: Nature's Stained Glass
Author: Cassandra Coleman
Institution: University of Alabama
Department: Biological Sciences
Family: Gesneriaceae
Taxon: Columnea ciliata
Common Name:
Season/time of year:
Area:
State/Province: Country:
Longitude: Latitude:
Additional Information:

Click Here for a Larger Version
Back to Image Index
Caption: These beautiful plants light your walk through the understory in subtle shades of red.
Scientific Description/Explanation: Columnea ciliata, along with many other species of Columnea, is not the kind of plant you usually look for close to the forest floor. High above the heads of scientists and locals alike, C. ciliata turns a normal forest hike into a picture perfect stained glassed cathedral of color. Columneas are know for their showy flowers and interesting use of red on flowers, calyxes, leaves and stems to attract pollinators. This colorful display gives the delighted finder of this genus a faux stained glass appearance to the forest up above, and is an easy spot for hungry pollinators.

 

Submission #9
Title: Zapatitos
Author: Pamela Puppo
Institution: University of Porto
Department: Research Center in Biodiversity and Genetic Resources (CIBIO)
Family: Calceolariaceae
Taxon: Calceolaria speciosa Pennell
Common Name: slipper flowers, zapatitos
Season/time of year: June 2007
Area: Paucartambo
State/Province: Cusco Country: Peru
Longitude: W 71?36'54.7'' Latitude: S 13?21'14.1''
Additional Information:

Click Here for a Larger Version
Back to Image Index
Caption: Two pending flowers of Calceolaria speciosa waiting to be pollinated.
Scientific Description/Explanation: Calceolaria is a genus of oil-producing flowers characterized by its yellow, bilabiate corollas. These flowers are usually pollinated by specialized oil-gathering bees that collect the oils that the corollas produce as a reward for pollination. Often, the corollas of these species are closed and the stamens are yellow or whitish. Calceolaria speciosa however has lost the capacity for producing oil offering pollen as the only reward to its pollinators. Because of this it has the corolla wide open to show the dark brown stamens and get the attention of the pollen bees. This picture was taken in Paucartambo Province in Cusco, Peru, at S 13?21'14.1'', W 71?36'54.7'' and 3500 m (11456 ft) elevation.

 

Submission #10
Title: Red carpets in the sand
Author: Pamela Puppo
Institution: University of Porto
Department: Research Center for Biodiversity and Genetic Resources (CIBIO)
Family: Aizoaceae
Taxon: Mesembryanthemum nodiflorum L.
Common Name: Egyptian Fig-marigold, cosco, cofe-cofe, gazul, barrilha
Season/time of year: 17 May 2010
Area: Los Abades
State/Province: Tenerife Island Country: Spain
Longitude: W 16?27'16.4'' Latitude: N 28?08'28.1''
Additional Information:

Click Here for a Larger Version
Back to Image Index
Caption: Close up photo of Mesembryanthemum nodiflorum showing its red stems and leaves.
Scientific Description/Explanation: This plant is native in the Canary Islands and Madeira archipelagos. Its stems and leaves are cylindrical, green turning red with time. The plant is covered with unicellular hairs filled with water that gives it a papillose aspect and because of this it has been used as a source of soda in former times. These plants are also important because they avoid the wind erosion of the soil in the islands since they cover ample extensions of sand in the coastal deserts. This picture shows the red stems and leaves, dry leaves (yellowish) and some flower buds (white) of Mesembryanthemum nodiflorum. This picture was taken in the coastal desert of Tenerife in the area of Los Abades at N 28?08'28.1'', W 16?27'16.4'' and 90 m (295 ft) elevation.

 

Submission #11
Title: Flowers of Echium wildpretii
Author: Pamela Puppo
Institution: University of Porto
Department: Research Center for Biodiversity and Genetic Resources (CIBIO)
Family: Boraginaceae
Taxon: Echium wildpretii Pearson ex Hook. f.
Common Name: Tenerife bugloss, Taginaste del Teide, Taginaste rojo, orgullo de Tenerife
Season/time of year: 21 May 2010
Area: Teide National Park
State/Province: Tenerife Island Country: Spain
Longitude: W 16?34'29.4''Latitude: N 28?14'14.5''
Additional Information:

Click Here for a Larger Version
Back to Image Index
Caption: Close up picture of the inflorescence of Echium wildpretii showing the newly opened flowers (red), old, drying flowers (purple), the coiled inflorescence tips and the whitish hairy bracts.
Scientific Description/Explanation: Echium wildreptii belongs to the borage family (Boraginaceae) which is characteristic in having scorpioid cymes: the flowers are produced on the upper side and the tips of the inflorescences coil and straighten as the flowers mature. This species is endemic to the central part of Tenerife Island and it is composed by a dense rosette of leaves and a 1 to 3 meters inflorescence. This species is also monocarpic that is, the plant dies after flowering. The flowers of this species are red and produce abundant pollen and nectar so it can be pollinated by bees, butterflies and birds. This picture was taken in the Teide National Park, N 28?14'14.5'', W 16?34'29.4'', at 2370 m (7775 ft) elevation.

 

Submission #12
Title: Echium wildpretii in Teide National Park
Author: Pamela Puppo
Institution: University of Porto
Department: Research Center for Biodiversity and Genetic Resources (CIBIO)
Family: Boraginaceae
Taxon: Echium wildpretii Pearson ex Hook. f.
Common Name: Tenerife bugloss, Taginaste del Teide, Taginaste rojo, orgullo de Tenerife
Season/time of year: 21 May 2010
Area: Teide National Park
State/Province: Tenerife Island Country: Spain
Longitude: W 16?34'29.4''Latitude: N 28?14'14.5''
Additional Information:

Click Here for a Larger Version
Back to Image Index
Caption: Echium wildpretii standing in front of the Teide volcano in Tenerife Island.
Scientific Description/Explanation: Echium wildreptii is a biannual herb endemic to Tenerife Island. It produces a dense rosette of leaves during its first year and the second year a 1 to 3 m inflorescence. It is monocarpic, which means that the plant dies after flowering. The flowers of this species are red and produce abundant pollen and nectar so it can be pollinated by bees, butterflies and birds. This picture was taken in the Teide National Park, N 28?14'14.5'', W 16?34'29.4'', at 2370 m (7775 ft) elevation.

 

Submission #13
Title: Top view of a root nodule from Pisum sativum with DR5::GUS auxin responsive reporter construct
Author: Allison Schwartz
Institution: University of California, Los Angeles
Department: Molecular, Cell and Developmental Biology
Family: Pisum sativum
Taxon:
Common Name: Pea
Season/time of year:
Area:
State/Province: Country:
Longitude: Latitude:
Additional Information:

Click Here for a Larger Version
Back to Image Index
Caption: This nodule is happy to be fixing nitrogen!
Scientific Description/Explanation: This image is a top view of a nodule on the root of a pea plant inoculated with symbiotic rhizobia. In order to study how the development of root nodules is influenced by Bacillus simplex 30N-5, a beneficial soil bacteria capable of secreting the plant hormone auxin, we used a pea plant with a reporter construct that is responsive to auxin. This DR5::GUS responsive element drives the beta-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene, ultimately resulting in a blue stain in areas responding to auxin. The "eyes" of this happy nodule are actually the ends of two prongs that connect to a single vein down the side of the nodule and end at the root's xylem. These blue vein-like structures later become the vascular tissue of the nodule, allowing the nitrogen-fixing rhizobia inside access to water. Interestingly, pea roots co-inoculated with both rhizobia and and B. simplex 30N-5 have larger nodules that develop more proto-vascular "veins" around the sides of the nodule. This is likely due to the auxin that B. simplex can secrete when associated with plant roots.

 

Submission #14
Title: Pollinating chicory
Author: Tomas Zavada
Institution: University Of Massachusetts, Boston
Department: Biology
Family: Asteraceae
Taxon: Cichorium intybus
Common Name: Chicory
Season/time of year: summer - August
Area: Boston
State/Province: Massachusetts Country: USA
Longitude: 71?04W Latitude: 42?22N
Additional Information: NIKON E4800

Click Here for a Larger Version
Back to Image Index
Caption: Metallic Green Bee (Agapostemon texanus) pollinating Chicory (Cichorium intybus)
Scientific Description/Explanation: Cichorium intybus (chicory) is a self-incompatible species, owing its genetic variety to the outcrossing nature. It means that pollen has to come from other chicory plants in order to produce seeds. This process creates genetic diversity in next generations. The closely related domesticated species Cichorium endivia (endive) is self-compatible. Endive is a crop only known from cultivation and has much lower genetic diversity compared to chicory. Genetically uniform crop strains are in wide use and one of the big challenges these days is to maintain the disappearing diverse varieties of crops and their wild ancestors.

 

Submission #15
Title: One night only
Author: Alan Franck
Institution: University of South Florida
Department: CMMB
Family: Cactaceae
Taxon: Harrisia regelii
Common Name:
Season/time of year: summer
Area: Sarasota
State/Province: Florida Country: USA
Longitude: Latitude:
Additional Information:

Click Here for a Larger Version
Back to Image Index
Caption: The nocturnal flower of Harrisia regelii is open for one night only.
Scientific Description/Explanation: The nocturnal flowers of Harrisia regelii are quite large (ca. 17 cm long x 10 cm wide) compared to the elongate stem (ca. 1-2 cm wide) which can be seen in the background on the right. From initial bud formation, the flowers may take a month to effloresce. Despite this they last only one night and begin to close and wilt the next day. Studying their flowers can be difficult unless under constant supervision, as here in cultivation.

 

Submission #16
Title: Hebe odora (Plantaginaceae)
Author: Julie Bergene
Institution: University of Kansas
Department: Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Family: Plantaginaceae
Taxon: odora
Common Name: Boxwood Hebe
Season/time of year: August
Area: Taupo
State/Province: Waikato Country: New Zealand
Longitude: 176.0694?ELatitude: 38.6875?S
Additional Information:

Click Here for a Larger Version
Back to Image Index
Caption: Eye dazzling Hebes in native New Zealand
Scientific Description/Explanation: This boxwood Hebe is endemic to the North Island of New Zealand and can grow up to a foot in height. It is an erect, growing evergreen shrub with glossy green, spear-shaped leaves that are stacked in rows in opposite pairs. Flowers, which are not shown, can be white, purple, pink or red are arranged in spikes, panicles or racemes. Research suggests that the ancestor of the genus Hebe came to New Zealand about 5 million years ago from either Australia or Asia. The genus Hebe is the largest genus of flowering plants in New Zealand with over 100 species.

 

Submission #17
Title: Cocos nucifera (Arecaceae)
Author: Julie Bergene
Institution: University of Kansas
Department: Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Family: Arecaceae
Taxon: nucifera
Common Name: Coconut
Season/time of year: July
Area: Orpheus Island
State/Province: Queensland Country: Australia
Longitude: 146.5050 ELatitude: 18.6308 S
Additional Information:

Click Here for a Larger Version
Back to Image Index
Caption: Washed-up coconut: A renewed life
Scientific Description/Explanation: This germinating coconut has washed up on the open ocean side of Orpheus Island in the Great Barrier Reef, Queensland, Australia. Cocos nucifera is a large palm that reaches heights of 100 feet with costapalmately lobed leaves and sheathing fibrous leaf bases. The coconut relies on wind and water dispersal to inhabitat new areas by drifting. The fruit is a single drupe and the coconut that is normally recognized is considered the stony endocarp. The species is known for its versatility in food and materials.

 

Submission #18
Title: Tabernaemontana divaricata Fruit dissected (Naturally)
Author: Md Shahadat Hossan
Institution: University of Bedfordshire
Department: Bedfordshire & Hertfordshire Postgraduate Medical School
Family: Apocynaceae
Taxon: divaricata (L.) R. Br.
Common Name: Tagar (Bengali); Katthomani (tribal)
Season/time of year: 7/11/2007 4:22 PM
Area: Ghumdhum, Nikhangchari
State/Province: Bandarban, Chittagong Country: Bangladesh
Longitude: 21.192135Latitude: 92.169765
Additional Information: Size: 2.07 MB, Date taken: 27/11/2007 4:22 PM, Dimensions: 2896 X 1944, Camera Model: Nikon D40X, ISO speed: ISO 400, F-stop: f/5.6, Exposure time: 1/40 sec, Exposure bias: 0 step, Focal length: 55 mm, Max aperture: 5

Click Here for a Larger Version
Back to Image Index
Caption: Tabernaemontana divaricata Naturally dissected fruit
Scientific Description/Explanation: Tabernaemontana divaricata is a shrub or small tree, maximum of 5 m high, bark color is pale gray-brown, branches lenticellate, terete, glabrous. Leaves of a pair equal or unequal, herbaceous when fresh, thinly papery when dried, elliptic or narrowly elliptic. Flowering and fruiting: May-August, almost all over the year. This is a wild plant's photo, it grows in roadsides, margins of the forests. Distribution outside Bangladesh: India, Nepal, Bhutan, Myanmar, Thailand, Laos and China. Medicinal uses: The plant is commonly used in Bangladesh for the treatment of Abdominal pain, Asthma or breathing problem, root's juice is very helpful for GIT problem, Chest pain, Jaundice, loss of appetite, old cough, Gastric and Duodenal ulcer, fever with convulsion, Excessive blood loss at the time of menstruation etc.

 

Submission #19
Title: Sand Prairie
Author: Derek Shiels
Institution: Central Michigan University
Department: Biology
Family:
Taxon:
Common Name:
Season/time of year:
Area: Sand Prairie Conservation Area
State/Province: Missouri Country: United States
Longitude: Latitude:
Additional Information: Cannon Rebel XTi

Click Here for a Larger Version
Back to Image Index
Caption: Hunting for Schoenoplectiella hallii, a wetland plant, at Sand Prairie Conservation Area, Missouri.
Scientific Description/Explanation: When you think of the sedge genus Schoenoplectus (or commonly the bulrushes), what comes to mind? Maybe you are picturing the tall plants dotting the shorelines of lakes and rivers? Until recently, this genus (group of plants) also included Schoenoplectus hallii, a plant that can grow here in the sand prairies of southeastern Missouri. This plant is now a member of the genus Schoenoplectiella. A systematist is one who describes biodiversity and determines from multiple sources of data, which plants belong together in a group. Schoenoplectiella species can occur is seasonally wet habitats such as sandy swales (the type of wetland I was searching for at this conservation area in Missouri), while Schoenoplectus species are restricted to permanently wet habitats.

 

Submission #20
Title: Elegant mariposa
Author: James Riser
Institution: Washington State University
Department: School of Biological Sciences
Family: Liliaceae
Taxon: Calochortus elegans
Common Name: Elegant mariposa
Season/time of year: Summer
Area: Mary Minerva McCroskey State Park
State/Province: Idaho Country: Latah
Longitude: Latitude:
Additional Information:

Click Here for a Larger Version
Back to Image Index
Caption:
Scientific Description/Explanation: Elegant mariposa or sego lily is a common summer wildflower of montane areas in eastern Washington, Idaho, and western Montana. The very hairy petals give it the alternate common name cat's ear lily.

 

Submission #21
Title: Beauty and the beast
Author: James Riser
Institution: Washington State University
Department: School of Biological Sciences
Family: Orchidaceae
Taxon: Cypripedium montanum
Common Name: Montain Lady slipper
Season/time of year: Summer
Area: Mary Minerva McCroskey State Park
State/Province: Idaho Country: L
Longitude: Latitude:
Additional Information:

Click Here for a Larger Version
Back to Image Index
Caption: This beautiful mountain lady slipper orchid flower harbors a crab spider awaiting unsuspecting insect visitors.
Scientific Description/Explanation: Lady slipper orchids are one of the showiest US orchids and the mountain lady slipper is one of the more common Cypripedium species. Crab spiders are common ambush predators that are often found on orchid flowers awaiting their next meal.

 

Submission #22
Title: Showy milkweed and hawk moth
Author: James Riser
Institution: Washington State University
Department: School of Biological Sciences
Family: Apocynaceae
Taxon: Asclepias speciosa
Common Name: Showy milkweed
Season/time of year:
Area: The Palouse
State/Province: Washington Country: Whitman
Longitude: Latitude:
Additional Information:

Click Here for a Larger Version
Back to Image Index
Caption: A hawk moth taking nectar from the blooms of showy milkweed (Asclepias speciosa)
Scientific Description/Explanation: Showy milkweed flowers are an important source of nectar for many insects. If large enough to remove the pollinia, some insects act as pollinators. This hawk moth is unlikely a pollinator as it never lands on the milkweed flowers. Instead it takes nectar while hovering like a humming bird.

 

Submission #23
Title: Asclepias syriaca inflorescence.
Author: James Riser
Institution: Washington State University
Department: School of Biological Sciences
Family: Apocynaceae
Taxon: Asclepias syriaca
Common Name: Common milkweed
Season/time of year: Summer
Area:
State/Province: MASSACHUSETTS Country:
Longitude: Latitude:
Additional Information: Picture taken during the Botany2010 meeting.

Click Here for a Larger Version
Back to Image Index
Caption: Asclepias syriaca inflorescence.
Scientific Description/Explanation: As the name implies, common milkweed (Asclepias syriaca) is one of the most frequently encountered milkweed species east of the Great Plains. The large flowers and multiple inflorescences make it an important nectar source for many insects. Milkweeds are also critical habitat for monarch butterflies as they are the sole food source for the developing larvae.

 

Submission #24
Title: Biological control of Nectria haematococca
Author: Irma Ortiz
Institution: UCLA
Department: Molecular Cell and Developmental Biology
Family: Family: Nectriaceae
Taxon: Nectria haematococca
Common Name: Nectria haematococca
Season/time of year:
Area: Laboratory at University of California, Los Angeles, 90095- 1606
State/Province: CA Country: USA
Longitude: Latitude:
Additional Information: Camera model: FE370; Focal length: 6.3 mm; F-number: F/3.5; Exposure time: 1/25 sec.

Click Here for a Larger Version
Back to Image Index
Caption: The fungal pathogen Nectria haematococca is suppressed by a bacteria Bacillus subtilis on potato dextrose agar
Scientific Description/Explanation: Control of plant disease is necessary for agriculture in the 21st century because there is loss of crops diseased with pathogens. Additionally, biological control microorganisms offer an environmentally friendly alternative to the use of chemicals. Several microorganisms that belong to Bacillus genera are biological control microorganisms that suppress fungal pathogens. In this image, Bacillus subtilis suppresses Nectria haematococca on a growth media containing potato. Bacillus subtilis secretes antifungal metabolites in order to inhibit fungal pathogens.

 

Submission #25
Title:
Author: James Riser
Institution: Washington State University
Department: School of Biological Sciences
Family: Drosophyllaceae
Taxon: Drosophyllum lusitanicum
Common Name: Portuguese sundew
Season/time of year: Fall/Winter
Area: Near Coimbra
State/Province: Country: Portugal
Longitude: Latitude:
Additional Information:

Click Here for a Larger Version
Back to Image Index
Caption: Portuguese sundew (Drosophyllum lusitanicum)
Scientific Description/Explanation: Portuguese sundew (Drosophyllum lusitanicum) is a rare carnivorous plant from western Portugal, extreme southwestern Spain, and northern Morocco. Long thought to be in the same family as the cosmopolitan genus Drosera, molecular research has placed Drosophyllum in its own monotypic family, the Drosophyllaceae. Prey capture and digestion in Portuguese sundew is very similar as in Drosea.

 

Submission #26
Title: Poisonous or not??? - To be or not to be... -Solanum dulcamara?!
Author: Valentin Barca
Institution: Carol Davila University of Medicine and Pharmacy
Department: Pharmacognosy
Family: Solanum (Solanaceae)
Taxon: dulcamara
Common Name:
Season/time of year: summer
Area: Valea Cernei (Cerna Valey)
State/Province: Mehedinti county Country: Romania
Longitude: Latitude:
Additional Information: Canon T90 f/8, ISO-50, Fuji Velvia, f=90mm, METERING MODE center, NO FLASH, APERTURE PRIORITY. Slide scanned.

Click Here for a Larger Version
Back to Image Index
Caption: Poisonous or not? - To be or not to be... -Solanum dulcamara general habitus
Scientific Description/Explanation: Solanum is a large, cosmopolitan genus with multiple uses in medicine, food, religious practices, etc. One cannot overestimate the economic importance of the representatives of this genus. Some species in countless varieties are highly appreciated worldwide as staple foods, some are highly toxic and a valued source of active compounds used in medicine. Romanian traditional medicine uses some species of this genus in various preparations. It is of paramaount importance to accurately identify the Solanum taxa. This photo documents the distinctive diagnostic features of Solanum dulcamara, showing all stages from flower to ripe fruit. -Flower with violet petals and light orange stamens on long, slender, multibranched pedicels, ovoid (egg-shaped) red fruits (green when unripe), with persistent kalix (sepals).

 

Submission #27
Title: Gentiana punctata , a threatened valuable medicinal plant in situ in Rodna Mountains North Romania
Author: Valentin Barca
Institution: Carol Davila University of Medicine and Pharmacy
Department: Pharmacognosy
Family: Gentiana
Taxon: punctata
Common Name: Romanian = ghintzura or gentziana; German = Enzian
Season/time of year: August /summer
Area: Pietrosul Rodnei, Rodna Mts, BORSA city
State/Province: Maramuresh County Country: Romania
Longitude: Latitude:
Additional Information: PENTAX PENTAX K100D f/`9, ISO SPEED ISO-200, F=18MM, METERING MODE PATTERN, NO FLASH, APERTURE PRIORITY.

Click Here for a Larger Version
Back to Image Index
Caption: Gentiana punctata, general habitus, in situ in Rodna Mts., close to Pietrosul Rodnei peak
Scientific Description/Explanation: Gentiana (in Romanian ?gentziana? or ghintzura?; German ?Enzian? is a genus with important medicinal uses; G. lutea being one of the most known European representatives. Gentiana punctata is used in Romanian traditional medicine and also is used as a replacement for G. lutea ryzomes. This in situ picture documents the habitus of the plant within its habitat along the crest of Mount Pietrosul Rodnei, NW Romania. The natural habitat, in grass mats among screes and boulders is above the Pinus mugo line, among Rhododendron and occasional Vaccinium bushes. G. punctata can be easily distinguished by the 5-veined, opposite leaves and the sessile, axillary and terminal, campanulate (bell-shaped) flowers with yellow, brown-freckled corollas (petal crown). Overharvesting and scarcity brought entire populations of this species on the brink of extinction in many mountains of Romania, where is subsists due to its inaccessibility.

 

Submission #28
Title: Gentiana punctata , close-up of a threatened valuable medicinal plant in situ in Rodna Mountains North Romania
Author: Valentin Barca
Institution: Carol Davila University of Medicine and Pharmacy
Department: Pharmacognosy
Family: Gentiana
Taxon: punctata
Common Name: Romanian = ghintzura or gentziana; German = Enzian
Season/time of year: August /summer
Area: Pietrosul Rodnei, Rodna Mts, BORSA city
State/Province: Maramuresh County Country: Romania
Longitude: Latitude:
Additional Information: SONY DSC-H3 F/3.5 1/125; ISO-125.; f=6mm; metering mode pattern, FLASH compulsory, strobe return, aperture priority.

Click Here for a Larger Version
Back to Image Index
Caption: Gentiana punctata, general habitus, in situ in Rodna Mts., close to Pietrosul Rodnei peak
Scientific Description/Explanation: Gentiana (in Romanian ?gentziana? or ghintzura?; German ?Enzian? is a genus with important medicinal uses; G. lutea being one of the most known European representatives. Gentiana punctata is used in Romanian traditional medicine and also is used as a replacement for G. lutea ryzomes. This in situ picture documents the habitus of the plant within its habitat along the crest of Mount Pietrosul Rodnei, NW Romania. The natural habitat, in grass mats among screes and boulders is above the Pinus mugo line, among Rhododendron and occasional Vaccinium bushes. G. punctata can be easily distinguished by the 5-veined, opposite leaves and the sessile, axillary and terminal, campanulate (bell-shaped) flowers with yellow, brown-freckled corollas (petal crown). Overharvesting and scarcity brought entire populations of this species on the brink of extinction in many mountains of Romania, where is subsists due to its inaccessibility.

 

Submission #29
Title: Sempervivum montanum, close-up of a neglected potentially medicinal plant in situ in Rodna Mountains North Romania
Author: Valentin Barca
Institution: Carol Davila University of Medicine and Pharmacy
Department: Pharmacognosy
Family: Crassulaceae
Taxon: montanum
Common Name: Romanian = urechelnitza
Season/time of year: August /summer
Area: Pietrosul Rodnei, Rodna Mts, BORSA city
State/Province: Maramuresh County Country: Romania
Longitude: Latitude:
Additional Information: SONY DSC-H3 F/3.5 1/125; ISO-125.; f=6mm; metering mode pattern,

Click Here for a Larger Version
Back to Image Index
Caption: Sempervivum montanum, general habitus, in situ in Rodna Mts., close to Pietrosul Rodnei peak
Scientific Description/Explanation: Sempervivum (in Romanian ?urechelnita?; German ?Hauswurtz? is a genus with important medicinal uses; Sempervivum tectorum being one of the most known European representatives. Sempervivum montanum is not widelly used in Romanian traditional medicine, but it is sometimes mistakenly colected instead of it's larger relatives S. tectorum or S. marmoreum which are used in Romanian traditional medicine. This in situ picture documents the habitus of the plant within its habitat along the crest of Mount Pietrosul Rodnei, NW Romania. The natural habitat, in moss mats in screes and on boulders is well above the Pinus mugo line and Rhododendron or Vaccinium bushes. Sempervivum montanum can be easily distinguished by the much smaller rosettes which are about the same size or smaller than the flowers. Overharvesting for ornamental uses and by mistake, also threatens some populations of this species on the brink of extinction in mountain areas of Romania, where is subsists due to its relative inaccessibility.

 

Submission #30
Title: Sempervivum montanum, a neglected potentially medicinal plant in situ in Rodna Mountains North Romania
Author: Valentin Barca
Institution: Carol Davila University of Medicine and Pharmacy
Department: Pharmacognosy
Family: Sempervivum (Crassulaceae)
Taxon: montanum
Common Name: Romanian = urechelnitza
Season/time of year: August /summer
Area: Pietrosul Rodnei, Rodna Mts, BORSA city
State/Province: Maramuresh County Country: Romania
Longitude: Latitude:
Additional Information: SONY DSC-H3 F/3.5 1/125; ISO-125.; f=6mm; metering mode pattern

Click Here for a Larger Version
Back to Image Index
Caption: Sempervivum montanum, general habitus, in situ in Rodna Mts., close to Pietrosul Rodnei peak
Scientific Description/Explanation: Sempervivum (in Romanian ?urechelnita?; German ?Hauswurtz? is a genus with important medicinal uses; Sempervivum tectorum being one of the most known European representatives. Sempervivum montanum is not used in Romanian traditional medicine, but it is sometimes mistakenly colected instead of it's larger relatives S. tectorum or S. marmoreum which are used in Romanian traditional medicine. This in situ picture documents the habitus of the plant within its habitat along the crest of Mount Pietrosul Rodnei, NW Romania. The natural habitat, in moss mats in screes and on boulders is well above the Pinus mugo line and Rhododendron or Vaccinium bushes. Sempervivum montanum can be easily distinguished by the much smaller rosettes which are about the same size or smaller than the flowers. Overharvesting for ornamental uses and by mistake, also threatens some populations of this species on the brink of extinction in mountain areas of Romania, where is subsists due to its relative inaccessibility.

 

Submission #31
Title: Aconitum sp, an important medicinal plant in situ in Rodna Mountains North Romania
Author: Valentin Barca
Institution: Carol Davila University of Medicine and Pharmacy
Department: Pharmacognosy
Family: Aconitum
Taxon: sp
Common Name:
Season/time of year: July /summer
Area: Pietrosul Rodnei, Rodna Mts, BORSA city
State/Province: Maramuresh County Country: Romania
Longitude: Latitude:
Additional Information: SONY DSC-H3 F/3.5 1/125; ISO-125.; f=6mm; metering mode: pattern,

Click Here for a Larger Version
Back to Image Index
Caption: Aconitum sp, general habitus, in situ in Rodna Mts., close to Pietrosul Rodnei peak
Scientific Description/Explanation: Aconitum is a genus with important medicinal uses. Its representatives are important medicinal plants having strong toxic activity. Misidentification though poses serious problems for wild harvesting. This in situ picture documents the habitus of the plant within its habitat along the crest of Mount Pietrosul Rodnei, NW Romania. The natural habitat, in grass mats in screes and on boulders is above the Pinus mugo line sometimes along with Rhododendron or Vaccinium bushes. Overharvesting for ornamental uses and by mistake, also threatens some populations in mountain areas of Romania.

 

Google
BSA Online Images

Back to the top

 PLANT SCIENCE BULLETIN  

» BOOKS NEEDING REVIEW
» ANNOUNCEMENTS

  BOTANY IN THE NEWS   

» The Erosion of Collections-Based Science: Alarming Trend or Coincidence?



Botanical Society Of America Inc


  BOTANY BLOGS   

» Uncommon Ground
» The Phytophactor
» Active Visual Learning
» Moss Plants and More
» No seeds, no fruits, no flowers: no problem.
» A Wandering Botanist
» Botany Professor

  IDEAS WORTH SPREADING (TED)   

» The hidden beauty of pollination
» The roots of plant intelligence
» Why we're storing billions of seeds
» Nalini Nadkarni on conserving the canopy
» Why can't we grow new energy?
» World's oldest living things

 FEATURED BSA RESOURCES

» BSA members' PLANT VIDEOS online
  

» Economic Botany - How We Value Plants....
» Crime Scene Botanicals - Forensic Botany

  STUDENTS' CORNER

» Why should you join the Society as a student?

» NEW MEMBERS - Connecting with the BSA

Careers in Botany

» POSITIONS CURRENTLY AVAILABLE
» Post a Position

» Some Careers Ideas
    • An Adventure - this is my job!
    • International Journey to a Botany Career
    • Botany as a career: Still having fun
» BOTANY - the students' perspective
    • Tanya, University of California
    • Patricia, University of Washington
    • Cheng-Chiang, Harvard University
    • Uromi, Yale University

     Botanical Society of America - find us on facebook       Botanical Society of America - find us on twitter
                        Botanical Society of America - find us on Flickr
Planting Science Project
Careers in Botany BSA Image Collection www.PlantingScience.org Classroom Plant Talking Points McIntosh Apple Development Project